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LETTERS & EMAILS THAT I'VE RECEIVED

as a result of My Tribute to the.......

WWII Troop Train Wreck of July 6, 1944

www.TroopTrain.com

GOD BLESS AMERICA


   


murtz_dick

 

Below are letters, emails and reports I've accumulated on this tragic troop train wreck




 


 
 

 



Monday, August 26, 2013 5:50 PM

From: "Paula/David" <pprindle@intelliwave.com>om

Dear Phil,

Bob was in the second car of the troop train and was knocked unconscious. When he woke up from his injuries, he had been taken in by some local people who had pulled him from the wreck and carried him to their house. Over the next few months, he traveled to various hospitals for surgeries to his head, shoulder, and knee. Bob was discharged honorably from the Army at Moore General Hospital in Asheville, North Carolina in October, 1944, due to his injuries. He returned home for more recuperation and more surgery at a local hospital. Bob had a hard time receiving accolades of a WWII veteran, since he was in the Army such a short period of time, and hadn't even gotten to basic training.

Paula and David Prindle

Date: Saturday, August 24, 2013 7:26 PM

Subject: survivor photo for www.TroopTrain.com

From: "Paula/David" <pprindle@intelliwave.com>

re: Photo of Pvt. Robert G. Prindle, Orient, OH (note address)

Bob died last year on Feb. 21, 2012.
He was 91.
He was discharged from the Army and the hospital at the same time in October, 1944.
More information to follow.

Paula & David Prindle

 



Claude Lyle Latham

Jellico troop wreck of 44
Wednesday, March 13, 2013 1:03 PM
From: "tom latham" <tla7528@aol.com>

Dear Phil,
Stumbled upon your web site and was so thankful to see all the information you have work so hard to collect. Our dad, Claude Lyle Latham also was a survivor on that train ride. He told us as kids he scared his mother almost to death because his troop car was reported to have crashed ,in truth it was saved by being shuffled to the rear of the train at their last stop. He told us he woke up and was handed a pistol and told to go outside and stand guard to prevent looting. He was never so scared in his life. I hope I can supply you with his military picture, I'll have to do some digging. Until then.

Sincerely

Tom Latham TLa7528@aol.com
419-382-7528
Toledo, Ohio

Fwd: Jellico troop wreck of 44
Wednesday, March 13, 2013 2:18 PM
From: "tom latham" <tla7528@aol.com>

Phil
...............Is there a military roster from 44? Dad says he was in car "A" and it got moved to the rear at last stop. I would like to know. Claude Lyle Latham's hometown was Monroeville, Ohio. Born in 1922.
Thank you again.
Tom Latham


Son of a wreck survivor
Wednesday February 27, 2013 9:01 AM
From: "oho@neo.rr.com" <oho@neo.rr.com>

Phil,

My father was one of the survivors of this wreck. I guess he was one of the luckier
ones, he only had a broken arm. He said he pulled himself out of the water onto
a rock, went to wipe his hair out of his eyes and discovered his arm was broken.
That is about all I ever heard about the accident and had no idea how bad it was.
He is listed as number 69 on your list however his first name and town are listed incorrectly
it should be Orvin Oswald and Hartville OH.
This is the first time I have found any details about the accident.

Thank you.

Orvin Oswald Jr.


email from www.TroopTrain.com
Friday, November 16, 2012 8:23 PM
From: "Blev3871@aol.com"
To: Phil

Hi Phil,
Just wanted to tell you that my Dad was there when the wreck happened.
He worked for the L and N railroad.
He knew more about what happened than anybody I ever heard talk about the wreck.
He wrote an article for the news paper I have the article.
If you would give me a call I would like to talk to you about it. I grew up at Emlyn, about 30 miles north of the wreck.
I saw the train pass where I lived the night it wrecked. 

Roy L. Blevins 513-722- 3871


Friday, October 12, 2012 5:58 PM
From: "randolph abbott" <ttobbar@msn.com>
To: Phil Lea

I just blundered on this site about the train wreck. I never knew the details of this wreck until I blundered here today, but my father was an army mp from Oak Ridge who was sent to help. I remember one time when we headed to Jellico that we passed where the train wrecked. The highway is on one side of the river and the train tracks on the other. Back in the 1950's there was still debris from the wreck along the bank between the tracks and the river. My father told me some stories about the wreck but I have forgotten all but the one about when he caught a man going through the pockets of a dead soldier. My father said he made the man stop and ran him away.

Randy Abbott
Roanoke, Va


FROM: Lee Oliver LeeMarie.Oliver@asu.edu
TO: Phil Lea
DATE: Wednesday, May 30, 2012 3:44 PM

My father, Norman Lee Ray, was a survivor of the Jellico Mountain Train Wreck, Campbell County, Tennessee of July 6, 1944.

He enlisted June 25, 1944 at 18 years of age. His home of residence was Twin Falls, Idaho. He was in one of the cars that were dangling down the side of the bridge. He risked his life and crawled down the seats like a ladder and rescued some of the men by carrying them up the seats to the top of the bridge.

He cut out the article in the Tennessee newspaper and sent it to his parents while waiting to board another train to Camp Croft, SC. He helped to support the “Battle of The Bulge” in France by driving Army personnel and equipment to the front lines.

In 1945 he was driving a Lieutenant when his jeep ran over a land mine and the explosion killed the Lieutenant. Dad had shrapnel hit the side of his face seriously injuring him. He was taken to a MASH Unit, then to a French hospital and transported to the U.S. for recovery at Madigan Medical Army Hospital in Tacoma, WA. After his recovery he was Medically discharged.

I am including a photo of dad in his Army uniform.

He and my mother, Mary Henscheid, married January 23, 1950. They had 6 children, 17 grandchildren, 15 great grandchildren.

He passed away of heart disease June 2, 1987.

Thank you for creating this website!

Lee Marie Oliver


FROM: Lee Oliver
TO: Phil Lea
Tuesday, June 5, 2012 3:26 PM
Subject: Norman Lee Ray-Train Wreck 2

Since I sent you the photo of dad, Norman Lee Ray, my brother, Loren, forwarded the scanned newspaper clippings and letter sent to his parents, Gordon and Gladys Ray, from Camp Stewart, GA, July 25, 1944 regarding the train wreck. My dad’s nick name was Rusty because of his red hair.

Below is a recap of the timeline taken from his letter to his parents.

* July 3: Boarded the train in Douglas, Utah
* July 4: Arrive in Denver, Colorado
* July 5: Arrive St. Louis, Missouri
* July 6: Arrive Jellico, Tennessee when they feel a jerk then starts rocking at 9:00 p.m. He remembers thinking the railcar was going to tip over. The man on the upper bunk, Frank, rolls off his bunk and lands on top of him knocking the wind out of him. He got a bruise on his head, a sprained finger and smashed toe. He and three other recruits climbed out of their car and walked to the railcar hanging over the bank of the cliff. He went into the railcar climbing down the center using the seats as a ladder until finally he was on the ceiling. He felt dizzy and describes the sensation like being in a fun house at the Fair. He could only see one man. He helped him to his feet. The man was semi-conscious and very heavy (dad weighed 120 lbs.) but he managed to help him to where the other three “boys” were waiting. He asked one to help him with the man. Within six hours after the train wreck they had the railroad tracks cleared and the survivors were transferred to another train and on their way to training camp.

Another link you might be interested in reading is http://thelibrary.org/lochist/oreilly/index.cfm. The O’Reilly General hospital is where dad was sent in 1946 after he ran over a land mine taking military personnel and supplies to the front lines at the “Battle of the Bulge”. The Lt. was killed and dad got shrapnel to the right side of his face. He had to have all his teeth pulled and fitted for dentures. The O’Reilly Shamrock Hospital Newsletter, has a lot of interesting articles. It had the best oral surgeons. It opened in 1941 and closed August 1946. On page 8 is an article on the Dental services that were provided at that hospital. All recovering patients were sent to other hospitals. Dad was sent to Madigan Hospital, Tacoma, WA where he stayed until fully recovered. He was medically discharged December 1, 1946.

Lee Marie (Ray) Oliver
Mesa, Arizona



Subject: Jellico wreck survivors
From: MAC MCCOMBS (MAC@LOGANENT.COM)
Date: Wednesday, May 30, 2012 7:47 PM

Sir,

My father, PVT Harold F. McCombs survived the wreck with a fractured skull. He spent years in and out of various VA hospitals for treatment, which was fairly rudimentary at the time- a metal plate was sutured into his skull. Dad was born 02/18/1912 and had sired 6 of us kids at the time he was drafted. He managed to sire 9 more after recuperation so the injuries didn't slow him down that much. Poor Mom! Dad died 09/02/1982. A military photo is attached, presumably taken at Camp Atterbury Indiana shortly before the accident.

By the way, I'm the eldest of the 15 at 75 years age, and 8 of us survive.

Mac McCombs
Logan Enterprises Inc.
8844 US68N PO Box 839
West Liberty OH 43357
T: 800/473-9880
F: 937/465-9140


From: Christopher Schiltz <christopher.schiltz@gmail.com>
Sent: Saturday, March 24, 2012 8:34 AM
Subject: Jellico Mountain Trainwreck - Don Masline

Greetings -

I stumbled across your website concerning the Jellico Mountain Trainwreck. My great-uncle Don Masline (not Hasline as indicated on the website) perished that day. Could you please correct his last name? I don't have a photo of him - I'm a servicemember myself but I can see if my grandmother does.

Best regards,
Christopher


Subject: email from www.TroopTrain.com
From: Marcia Smith (mks.executivehr@gmail.com)
Date: Saturday, September 10, 2011 2:48 PM

Hello Mr Lea, thank you for putting together this website. We found a correction that needs to be made on the website. Our father-in-law / father, Howard Broemsen, was on the troop train that crashed in the gorge.

On page 11, under survivors, Howard's name is spelled "Howard Broeman, Louisville, Ky" --- it should be "Howard Broemsen, Louisville, OH".

Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have questions.

Kind Regards,
--Greg and Marcia Smith

Sent from my iPad


Jellico Troop Train Accident - Pvt Leonard J. Bettag
Saturday, May 14, 2011 2:10 PM
From: "David Van Bibber" <davevanb2@gmail.com>

Phil:
I came across your site (http://www.drwebman.com/trooptrainwreck/) and want to thank you for honoring all the troops on the train as well as the civilians who came to their aid.
The name Pvt. Leonard J. Bettag from Evansville, Indiana, listed as one of those on the train, caught my attention because I am from Evansville and my mother had some very good friends in her early life in Evansville who were Bettags (1920s-1940s). I gathered what I could find on your website about Leonard and then searched Evansville and other records to see what I could find out about him. The attached Word document has that information. I did not find a photo of him. I did find that there appears to be some errors on your site about Leonard. First it is definite that he did die as a result of the accident. The Army press release at the time plus the Evansville records that I found verify that he was one of those who were killed in the accident. On your website the copy of the Kingsport Times newspaper article refers to a Pvt. Leonard J. Battag from Evanston, Illinois in the wreckage. This no doubt was in error as to the spelling of his last name and his hometown because I seriously doubt that another man was on the train with a similar name and a similarly named hometown. Then, on your site, under "Survivors", it lists Leonard J. Battag of Evanston, Illinois as a survivor and when the link is followed to read his story it does not lead to anything about a "Battag" or "Bettag".
Again, thanks so much for keeping this story alive and making it available on the Internet. I served in the US Air Force (1954-58) and am in touch with many of those with whom I served and I am going to recommend your site to them.
David (Dave) W. Van Bibber
Hopkinsville, Ky
davevanb2@gmail.com


From: Rabbit <thepfcd@gmail.com>
Subject: Troop Train Wreck June 6, 1944
Date: Wednesday, March 23, 2011, 2:22 PM


Phil Lea,

My name is Kenneth Clingerman and I am the Grandson of the Late Robert Russel Clingerman that died on the Train in Tennessee. Yes, his middle initial was R not C, we don't know how this mistake happened but we would wish that you correct it on your website. I just wanted to touch base with you because my Father has a picture of his Father that he is going to mail to you so expect it in the next week or two. I think it is great that you have put this site up because none of us know much about what had happened since we grow up in the Hammond family! Thanks again


email from www.TroopTrain.com THROUGH THE EYES OF AN 11 TR. OLD.
Friday, March 11, 2011 11:40 AM
From: "Echo2K10@aol.com"

MR. LEA. I WAS 11 YRS. OLD AND LIVING IN LAFOLLETTE TENN. WHEN THIS TROOP TRAIN WRECKED ABOVE OUR HOME TOWN. I REMEMBER THE TERROR TO THIS DAY OF HEARING THE DETAILS. I WAS A RELIABLE 11 YR. OLD AND WAS ASKED BY MANY PEOPLE TO BABYSIT SO THEY COULD GO TO HELP. MANY OF THE SOLDIERS WERE CRUSHED BY THE TRAIN BUT STAYED ALIVE WHILE TRAPPED. SOME TALKED UNTIL THE WRECKAGE WAS LIFTED. ONE OF MY TEACHERS HELD A YOUNG BOYS HAND FOR THREE DAYS KNOWING HE WOULD DIE ONCE THE TRAIN WAS LIFTED. ALSO, MY FAMILY WORKED AT OAK RIDGE TENN. AS WE CALLED IT LATER " BUILDING THE BOMB ". I HEARD MANY STORIES. WE DROVE THROUGH THAT VALLEY MANY TIMES GOING TO VISIT MY GRANDMOTHER. THANKS FOR LISTENING.

ARETTA DE LANEY BALL echo2k10@aol.com


Troop Train Wreck
Thursday, March 10, 2011 3:20 PM
From: "CHARLES E CROLEY" <cejtcro@bellsouth.net>

Mr. Lea:

I am so glad to have found your website and the story of the troop train wreck south of Jellico, TN. in 1944. For many years, I have revisited this experience in my mind and wondered where to find information so related. You are doing a great service for the memories of the survivors and victims families. Thank you very much for your tribute to the soldiers of this accident. Also a personal thanks for bringing the story back for me.

My home town is Williamsburg, KY which is 20 or so miles north of the wreck site. At the time of this wreck, I was 8 years old. The wreck so vividly sticks in my mind because I personally visited the site the day following the wreck.

My dad was in the coal mining business at that time. He operated the mine and the business of trucking of the coal in 1944. He had planned to travel by truck to Lafollette, TN (which happened to be the day after the wreck) to pick up a load of steel rail, supplies and etc. for the mine. Highway US 25W was the route to Lafollette. As the stories you have already collected points out, highway US 25W is on one side of the river valley and the railroad is on the other side. However, the river is narrow and also the valley (more of a gorge - thus, the area is called the narrows). Therefore, the highway and the railroad was quite close several feet in elevation above the shallow river. That made the view of the wreck very clear and relatively close to the highway.

I often traveled with dad and his employees on such trips. I was fortunate to have been along on this trip and witnessed the carnage that has so vividly been described by other stories you have already collected. The pictures of the rail cars as they lay on the bank of the river and the engine in the edge of the river are displayed just as I remembered them.

I actually saw bodies of the dead that had been recovered and moved to the side of the highway. As I recall, their faces were covered with simple items such as newspaper as the recovery personnel awaited vehicles to remove the victims . I recall my dad and his employee making remarks about the location of bodies. And days later, comments were circulating about how the L&N Railroad Co. recovery people was going to remove so much heavy metal especially the engine: given the very limited work space. I recall a comment that "they would bring two wreckers for the heavy lifting". I (at 8 years of age) said "two wreckers cannot lift that engine". Of course, I was thinking of automotive wreckers - not railroad equipment. I had been around and up close to railroad steam engines many times and recognized the mass of this much iron.

If the railroad is followed north (from which the train was traveling), it passes through the town of Williamsburg. I heard comments from locals who witnessed that the train was traveling extremely fast (perhaps 2 or 3 time normal speed) as it passed through town and the steam whistle continued to "scream" for miles before and after it passed through town. I would judge this to have been in the range of 8:00 to 8:30pm based on the distance to travel and the recorded wreck time of 9:05pm. Many who witnessed the speed were not surprised and recognized that the train would not be able to negotiate the curved track as it entered the Narrows if it continued at the observed speed. The inevitable happened!

I consider it a privilege to have personally witnessed this incident - however tragic - and to have seen one of the tragedies so close to home as a result of World War II.

Thanks for the opportunity to share my life long memories of that fatal and tragic incident. I also pay tribute to the men of that preventable tragedy.

Charles E Croley
Louisville, Ky


 


Troop Train Wreck
Thursday, March 10, 2011 3:20 PM
From: "CHARLES E CROLEY" <cejtcro@bellsouth.net>
To: Phil Lea

Mr. Lea:

I am so glad to have found your website and the story of the troop train wreck south of Jellico, TN. in 1944. For many years, I have revisited this experience in my mind and wondered where to find information so related. You are doing a great service for the memories of the survivors and victims families. Thank you very much for your tribute to the soldiers of this accident. Also a personal thanks for bringing the story back for me.

My home town is Williamsburg, KY which is 20 or so miles north of the wreck site. At the time of this wreck, I was 8 years old. The wreck so vividly sticks in my mind because I personally visited the site the day following the wreck.

My dad was in the coal mining business at that time. He operated the mine and the business of trucking of the coal in 1944. He had planned to travel by truck to Lafollette, TN (which happened to be the day after the wreck) to pick up a load of steel rail, supplies and etc. for the mine. Highway US 25W was the route to Lafollette. As the stories you have already collected points out, highway US 25W is on one side of the river valley and the railroad is on the other side. However, the river is narrow and also the valley (more of a gorge - thus, the area is called the narrows). Therefore, the highway and the railroad was quite close several feet in elevation above the shallow river. That made the view of the wreck very clear and relatively close to the highway.

I often traveled with dad and his employees on such trips. I was fortunate to have been along on this trip and witnessed the carnage that has so vividly been described by other stories you have already collected. The pictures of the rail cars as they lay on the bank of the river and the engine in the edge of the river are displayed just as I remembered them.

I actually saw bodies of the dead that had been recovered and moved to the side of the highway. As I recall, their faces were covered with simple items such as newspaper as the recovery personnel awaited vehicles to remove the victims . I recall my dad and his employee making remarks about the location of bodies. And days later, comments were circulating about how the L&N Railroad Co. recovery people was going to remove so much heavy metal especially the engine: given the very limited work space. I recall a comment that "they would bring two wreckers for the heavy lifting". I (at 8 years of age) said "two wreckers cannot lift that engine". Of course, I was thinking of automotive wreckers - not railroad equipment. I had been around and up close to railroad steam engines many times and recognized the mass of this much iron.

If the railroad is followed north (from which the train was traveling), it passes through the town of Williamsburg. I heard comments from locals who witnessed that the train was traveling extremely fast (perhaps 2 or 3 time normal speed) as it passed through town and the steam whistle continued to "scream" for miles before and after it passed through town. I would judge this to have been in the range of 8:00 to 8:30pm based on the distance to travel and the recorded wreck time of 9:05pm. Many who witnessed the speed were not surprised and recognized that the train would not be able to negotiate the curved track as it entered the Narrows if it continued at the observed speed. The inevitable happened!

I consider it a privilege to have personally witnessed this incident - however tragic - and to have seen one of the tragedies so close to home as a result of World War II.

Thanks for the opportunity to share my life long memories of that fatal and tragic incident. I also pay tribute to the men of that preventable tragedy.

Charles E Croley
Louisville, Ky


From: Bob Crouch <rcrouch6@woh.rr.com>
Subject: email from www.TroopTrain.com
To: Phil Lea
Date: Sunday, January 16, 2011, 4:15 PM

My dad Richard Crouch was on that train that wrecked. He just passed away last year at 84 years old. I loved him and miss him dearly.

He was from Ohio and returned there after the war. He also served in the Korean War.

Robert Crouch, Ohio


troop train wreck 1944
Wednesday, November 24, 2010 1:48 PM
From: "wamcghee@aol.com" <wamcghee@aol.com>


Hello, I am the grandson of Warren Victor "Red" McGhee, who lived in Clinton, Tn, played football at Tennessee Wesleyan (in the Hall of Fame), went on to play football at the University of Florida, in 1939, and worked on the Southern Railroad from about 1939 to his death in 1963 of cancer. I am doing some research for the family, and have heard my dad, who still lives in Clinton, Tn talk about a train wreck involving troops during WWII that his father was involved in.

Do you have any information about him on the train, etc,

Thanks in advance for any assistance,

W. Alan McGhee
(954) 699-6040


She Jumped The Tracks
Sunday, November 14, 2010 11:43 AM
From: "Betty Strickland" <betty_strickland@hotmail.com>
To: Phil Lea

I was born in Jellico Tennessee in 1940. I was too young to remember the train wreck in 1944, however I asked by brother Mike if he remembered.. He said our Daddy talked about it. He was there and saw the terrible effect it had on so many people.
He had a cafe in the center of Jellico called The Three Point Cafe. We left Jellico in 1949. I have so many fond memories of Jellico.


Betty Nappa Strickland


email from www.TroopTrain.com
Wednesday, August 25, 2010 5:57 AM
From: "ais@harlanonline.net"
To: Phil Lea

I just learned that my grandfather was killed in a train accident in 1941 in Knox County, Kentucky and was researching it, when I ran into your website. Wow...

I really found the story fascinating, and know that you have put a lot of hours into it. Thank you.

I have lived in southeastern Kentucky all of my 58 years, and went to college in Williamsburg. We used to sneak to Jellico because it was the closest place that sold liquor! I never heard of this accident before today.


Paula Hall
Harlan, Kentucky
 


Email from www.TroopTrain.com
Friday, March 5, 2010 11:29 PM
From: "jrosignola1950@aol.com"
To: Phil Lea

Hi, I  was looking at your web site on the train wreck. My dad was on that train. He was a survivor. He passed away in 2003. He told me about it. He said he was nearly sleeping when he heard some people yelling like they were watching a football game or something. That's what he thought. He didn't know the train went off the tracks until later when they told them in his car. He was lucky that night. Every time we passed Jellico Tennessee on the way to Florida he would say the train wreck was here back in the mountains a little. I'm enclosing a pic of him. His name was James S. Rosignola of Toledo Ohio. Thank you for this site honoring the soldiers. Sincerely, James S. Rosignola JR.


email from www.TroopTrain.com
Saturday, January 23, 2010 11:30 PM
From: "KAY HAMPTON" <budkay@verizon.net>
To: Phil Lea

VIEWING YOUR WEB-SITE ON TROOP TRAIN. VERY INTERESTING. WHILE READING OUR ADVERTISER A ARTICLE ON "PRIDE OF PICKAWAY" WAS A ARTICLE ON
HONORING WORLD WAR II VETERAN, ROBERT "BOB" PRINDLE WHO WAS INVOLVED IN THE TRAIN WRECK. HE RETIRED FROM THE APPOINTED POST-MASTER IN 1983. HE AND HIS WIFE ARE BOTH LIVING AND HIS ADDRESS IS.........
11173 BORROR ROAD. ORIENT, OHIO 43146...........I DID NOT FIND HIS NAME ON THE LIST OF MEN WHO SERVED, OR MAYBE I MISSED IT!

THANK YOU,
KAY


On Mon, 12/14/09, Darrin Mason <dmason29@yahoo.com> wrote:


From: Darrin Mason <dmason29@yahoo.com>
Subject: John Ralph Wickline
To: drwebman@yahoo.com
Date: Monday, December 14, 2009, 7:49 PM


Phil;
Let me know if these pics come out ok? I am a rookie at
sending attachments.
The first photo is his 1942 high school graduation pic and the other one was taken with his brothers and sisters at the end of June 1944 just before he left for the service (John is on the far right)

Darrin Mason


jellico train wreck
Sunday, December 13, 2009 8:53 PM
From: "Darrin Mason" <dmason29@yahoo.com>
To: Phil Lea

Phil,

Just browsed your site. A nice tribute to the men who lost there lives and the ones who
survived that terrible accident.
I am wondering if you are still collecting photos of the men who were killed as I have a photo of John Wickline of Orient, OH who died in the accident.

Darrin Mason


From: Barbara Sailor <rabs38@embarqmail.com>
Subject: email from www.TroopTrain.com
Date: Saturday, November 7, 2009, 11:19 AM

Phil,

There is an article in this morning’s paper about the troop train wreck. My brother-in-law, Richard Sailor, was on that train, but is not listed among the survivors in the article. He was assigned to one of the cars that went over the cliff, but just before the accident was sent to KP duty at the end of the train. The last car didn’t go over the cliff and although hurt, he survived. He is still living, and can be contacted at 937-596-6885. He lives in Jackson Center, Ohio.

Regards,

Barbara Sailor


On Fri, 10/30/09, Gene Sofie <glsofie@hotmail.com> wrote:

From: Gene Sofie <glsofie@hotmail.com>
Subject: Wayne Edward Clemens
To: Phil Lea
Date: Friday, October 30, 2009, 6:13 AM

Phil

Thank you for posting the information regarding this train wreck. A distant cousin, Wayne Edward Clemens was one of those killed in this wreck. Below is information regarding him and his family.

Clarence Jay Clemens, Wayne's father, was born in 11 June 1885 in Ohio and died on 26 January 1948 in Warren, Ohio. At the time of his death he was married to Grace Black.

His first wife was Jessie Pearl Young (Wayne's mother). They were married in about 1903. Jessie was born on 2 February 1886 in Lordstown, Ohio and died on 11 December 1928 in Lordstown. She was the daughter of August and Elizabeth Thatcher Young. In 1910 Clarence and Jessie were living in Lordstown. Clarence was a farmer.

In 1930 Clarence’s wife is Elvarene. Elvarene was born in about 1879 in Ohio. Her father was born in Ohio and her mother in Pennsylvania. Living in the household are Jay Klingensmith, age 21 and Doris Klingensmith, age 11, step children of Clarence. They are living next to Clarence’s parents.

Ralph M. Clemens, Wayne's brother, was born on 20 August 1903 in Ohio and died on 21 July 1965 in Los Angeles County, California. His wife was Harriet. Harriet was born was born in 1912 and died in 1973. In 1954 they were living at 1422 North Berendo Street, in Los Angeles. They are buried in the Hollywood Forever Cemetery, Hollywood, Los Angeles County, California. This cemetery is also known as the Hollywood Memorial Cemetery.

Arthur L. Clemens , Wayne's brother, was born on 20 January 1907 in Mineral Ridge, Ohio. His wife was Florence Alberta Rummell. Arthur died on 22 March 1961 in Cleveland, Ohio. Florence was born on 7 February 1908 in Mineral Ridge and died on 3 December 1974 in Mansfield, Ohio.

The correct spelling is with one M This verified by his social security death record.
WAYNE CLEMENS 29 Jan 1919 Jul 1944 (not specified) (none specified) 286-10-2867 Ohio
http://ssdi.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/ssdi.cgi

Your welcome use any or all the information provided on your website.

Regards
Gene Sofie
WAYNE CLEMENS 29 Jan 1919 Jul 1944 (not specified) (none specified) 286-10-2867 Ohio


From: "Mary Lou" <hudgo@medt.com>
Subject: Lyle Rollins, Engineer of Train
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2008 19:21:18 -0400

Corbin Times Tribune, Corbin, KY, 21 Feb 1975
Heads Or Tales
Like No Other Name
by Gene Siler
Windom Quinn lives on Meadow Creek.
No other name like this can be found anywhere from Dan to Beersheba so far as I know. It's not like Andy Faulkner or Jim Lawson or Bill Siler, you see.
So I didn't know what to make of this man or his name until he told me he married Edith Siler and his mother was a Rollins from Meadow Creek. After that I began to feel close kin to Windom.
Then I said, "Yes I will be up to your place to see you." And today I redeemed that promise.
They live in a house "about 100 years old" and underneath its smooth white exterior are logs hewn by pioneer Whitley County citizens long, long ago.
Proprietor and owner of the place is Roy Rollins, who "will be 84 tomorrow" -- never married because he couldn't find anybody willing to put up with him, he told me.
Windom says three Rollins brothers married three charming King sisters way back yonder and these Rollins-King combinations lived all up and down the creek with their households and left many Rollinses everywhere, including Eugene Rollins of Corbin.
Now the Quinn connection came along when one Lawrence Quinn migrated down here from Montreal, Canada, Lawrence, a doctor and construction man, finally wound up as store manager for Imperial Jellico Coal Company just across the ridge from Meadow Creek. Lawrence climbed over that tall ridge and married one of the Rollins girls on Meadow Creek. So this is where Windom emerged. He came from a Canadian ridge climber and a Meadow Creek Rollins.
As I talked with Windom and Edith and Uncle Roy and the Quinns' son, Windom, Jr., I got into the story of the disastrous train wreck that happened over near High Cliff, in the Narrows about a couple of miles below the Kentucky-Tennessee line. Lyle Rollins was the engineer.
Lyle, son of Rufus Rollins, was raised on Meadow Creek. He became an L&N engineer and was pilot of that ill-fated passenger train which took 35 lives on July 5, 1944. Lyle was a cousin of Windom Quinn and married Mae Smith, daughter of W.T. Smith, former Whitley County Court Clerk.
This wreck occurred around midnight. It was a troop train. All those killed were soldiers or train crew.
Engineer Rollins arrived in Corbin on that July evening after pulling another train up from Etowah. When the Train Master asked him to take the troop train south Rollins told him he was tired and not feeling well. The Train Master prevailed on him to take the wartime troop train south regardless. Rollins did so because he was needed.
The train was twenty-eight minutes late and traveling much too fast when it hit a sharp curve in the Narrows. It failed to make the curve, turned over on the river bank and carried many people, including Engineer Rollins, to tragic death down in the darkness of the river gorge.

On my way back to town I stopped at the Rufus Rollins place where Engineer Lyle Rollins was raised. This place has been renovated and looks like a southern mansion. It is occupied by the John Hudgens family. They came from Arkansas and two Hudgens girls are attending University of Kentucky. This Rufus Rollins place, now the John Hudgens place, contains 1800 acres and is today a regular showplace. John is a very cordial man and will show you his beautiful outlay almost at the drop of a hat. I hope to return there later.
Getting back to Uncle Roy Rollins -- "84 Sunday." He gave me some good advice as I left him. He said, "Now Gene you need to get out of that law office in Williamsburg and go out in the hollows and up the creeks and see many people. Did you know you have good Siler cousins on Meadow Creek?"
"Yes", Uncle Roy, "I know these Silers on Meadow Creek. They are excellent citizens and I have been in some of their homes -- Bill Siler, now deceased, John Siler, Jennie Powers, Nan Perkins and now Edith Quinn. I am proud of them. We all sprang from Jacob and Rachel Siler who came over from North Carolina about 1800. We are like the Rollinses, old settlers."
Then Uncle Roy gave me a long hard look. But I think he was pleased I had stopped at his place.


Transcribed by:
Mary Lou Hudson
Claypool, IN 46510
E-mail: hudgo@medt.com


Date: Sat, 5 Jul 2008 18:23:42 -0700 (PDT)
From: "Linda Mackey" <lindamackey2@sbcglobal.net>
Subject: email from www.TroopTrain.com

I remember growing up in Florida and taking family trips up to Delphos, Ohio, where my dad grew up and lived at the time he was drafted. Whenever we got near the I-75 turn off for Jellico, my dad would tell us the story of the troop train wreck.

While pondering this bit of family history, I did a search and found your website. I immediately sent a note to my brothers and sisters asking them to send their recollections of our dad, Melvin Kroeger, concerning the Jellico Gorge troop train wreck.
My oldest brother Ron sent my dad's army photo, and my youngest brother sent this great memory:

My recollection is this (I heard this story dozens of times, loving it every time!): When Dad got on to the train, he noticed that the beds were made so that the soldiers' beds faced the front of the train. He reasoned that if the train should crash, his neck would be broken. In typical Dad fashion, he cynically supposed that the government wanted them to die in a train wreck rather than be injured (and have to pay for their support for the rest of their lives)! He decided to remake his bed with his head facing the rear of the train. The wreck woke him up, and he apparently realized that the car he was in was dangling off the top of the gorge. He attempted to awaken the man in the top bunk, but he was so drunk that he wouldn't wake up. It was too dark for him to see what was below him outside the train. Dad opened a window (I believe it was on the left side of the train) and hurled the man out, leaping out after him. When he reached the ground, he saw that the ground he and his companion had safely landed on was only on the left side of the train. The right side of the train hung precariously over the gorge. He and his companion would have been killed or seriously injured if he had chosen to go out the right side of the train! Whew!!!

My mother, Dorothy, told us that she and my oldest two brothers were living with Dad's mother at the time of the wreck. My grandmother heard about the wreck before my mother did, and was torn at how to tell Mom. She was unaware if my dad was one of the survivors. Thankfully when they got the news it was good. Whew again!

Melvin Kroeger was 23 years old at the time of the crash and went on to paratrooper training, which went splendidly except for the tiny problem of the parachute that didn't open. After this second accident, he was relieved of military duty and went home to his wife and sons. They kept having kids until they got one who would remember the details of the Jellico Gorge Troop Train Wreck. In all they raised seven kids, and were doubly blessed with a slew of grandchildren.

Mel's cynical nature softened over the years, as reverberations from the parachute accident took their eventual physical toll.
Mevin Sylvester Kroeger passed away in 1991 a few weeks before his seventieth birthday.

I want to thank you for giving our family the chance to share this story of his with each other and with other survivors and their children, since so many of the stories are lost. Both of our parents have gone to be with Jesus now, and it's an honor to pass their stories on.

Linda Kroeger Mackey



(click to see larger image)


I received the following letter from Eva Abrams Burris in May 2008:

TROOP TRAIN WRECK:

On Thursday July 6, 1944, the L&N Troop Train with recruits
were on their way to Ft. Benning, Georgia when the train
wrecked at the Jellico Narrows in Campbell County, Tennessee.
The Clinton Western Union Office was located between Jellico,
Tennessee and Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This location was
convenient for the workers at Oak Ridge to send telegrams
to the public because it was a high secret Government Project
that helped to make the Atomic Bomb.

Eva Abrams and Anna Long were on duty at the Western Union
Office the day of the Troop Train Wreck. It had been a long
day and they were anxious go get off work in two hours and
go home. A telephone call changed their mind.

Mr. Maureen Owen, a nurse and Executive Secretary of the
Anderson County Chapter of the American Red Cross in Clinton,
Tennessee telephoned the Western Union Office. She notified
the operator a Troop Train wrecked at 9:05 PM near Jellico
with casualties and soldiers were killed. It was necessary
for the office to say open all night. The operators were
happy to work for Mrs. Owen, she was a lovely person, they
have worked for her on several occasions.

Mrs. Owen was in and out of the office all night gathering
information about the wreck and sending confidential telegrams
to the War Department. Anna and Eva did not smoke, but they
thought smoking would help them stay awake. Smoking did not
keep them awake. The Red Cross furnished donuts and coffee.
The operators left the office at 8 AM when the morning
operators arrived for work.
It was first thought the Troop Train disaster was caused by
sabotage and the was horrifying, but later they heard the
wreck was an accident. Some survivors went to to go overseas
and fight in World War II.

eab/1/29/08
 


From: cjzearley@hotmail.com
Subject: WWWtroop wreck
Date: Sat, 3 May 2008 08:44:35 -0400

Phil,

Enclosed our pictures of my father William Yelic of Massillon Ohio. Who was 26 years old at the time of the wreck. Dad got on the train in Massillon Ohio. His wife, Helen, and two daughters, Pat age 4 and Connie age 2,were there to see him off. Like most young men he had been drafted.

Most of what I am going to tell you is what my mother has been able to remember. Helen received a telegram at work that Bill had been injured in the July 6th train wreck and he was in the hospital recovering from his injuries. She took a train to Jellico were Dad had been taken to. Mom said he had cuts and scratches on his face ,hands and arms He had about a 6 inch cut down the middle of his back. Bill told Mom that he was in his bunk at the time of the wreck. And he also told her the train was going to fast before the wreck. Dad was released from the hospital after two weeks then sent on to Camp Croft. After training Dad was sent on to Germany.

After finding your web site I sent pictures of the wreck to my Mom. This was the first time she realized how bad the wreck was. I don't think my Dad even knew how bad it was. He never talked about it.

Bill passed away June 9,1985. Helen, Pat and Connie would like to thank you for honoring our husband and father on this web site.

Sincerely,
Connie (Yelic) Zearley


 
William Yelic


William Yelic in 1980


Rita A. (Blakely) Brown
Van Wert, OH 45891

Re: Troop train wreck survivor: Harley Bernard "Bernie" Blakely

Dear Mr. Lea

Enclosing photo of my late father, Harley Bernard Blakely, Sidney OH. Who was 25 years old at the time of the wreck.
Also what he had written about the troop train wreck.

I left for army service June 27, 1944. I was at Ft. Benjamin, Harrison, IN for 10 days - receiving shots, etc.
On July 6, 1944, we left on a troop train headed south. We changed engineers at Corbin, KY. Engineer was mad because he had to make this run, so he was going very fast. We got about two mile outside of Jellico, TN. There was a double curve around the side of the mountain. We made the first turn okay, but on the second one, the engine and four cars left the track rolling down the hill into the river. We were asleep in our bunks which probably saved our lives. The top of our car was torn off which made a quick exit. There were 8 men on board from Sidney, OH and all were hurt to some extent, but no one was killed.

Someone told me afterwards that I said, "Oh, my God, we are going to wreck." I can remember reaching for my pants and the next thing I remember I was sitting on a rock along the river and had my pants on--that way I saved my pocketbook. Most of the guys lost all their money and possessions. I did lose my duffle bag with personal items.

I received a depressed skull fracture. there were 34 GI's killed plus the fireman and engineer.

The people of Jellico, TN, gave first aid and did all they could in such an emergency. The top of my head was sewn up without any pain shots given. I was then taken on a fast ambulance ride to Oakridge, TN hospital. In a few days we were taken by bus to Veterans Hospital near Asheville, NC. All our papers were lost in the wreck and we had to take all our shots over again.

I was in there three months including 10 weeks of basic training. We were due to be shipped out, but because of my skull fracture, I was sent to Camp Atterberry (Atterbury), IN and given a medical discharge.

Pvt. Harley Bernard Blakely
Sidney, Ohio 45365

 


To follow is a letter I received on April 21, 2008

Dear Sir,

Found your web site on the internet and it reminded me that a friend was a survivor of the July 6, 1944 troop train wreck. I convinced him to let me send you his picture. He was in top bunk of one of the derailed Pullman cars. He was briefly knocked unconscious, otherwise unhurt. He is still going strong at eighty six years young. I just thought he deserves to be remembered as a little part of history.

His name:
Corporal James C. Page
12275 South Springboro Road
Battle Ground, Indiana 47920

Born 13 Jan. 1922

Thank you

Clyde J. Rockhill
2716 South 18 St.
Lafayette, Ind 47909


From: Lehmanpowers@wmconnect.com
Date: Fri, 4 Apr 2008 14:50:33 EDT

While searching for L&N train wrecks I ran across your website. Most interesting. I can't help with photos or the like but I do remember the accident. My dad, Elbert Powers was on the "section gang" (track maintenance) living at Morley. Although I was only 4 yrs old at the time, I vividly remember dad and the other members of the section gang being called out to the site to assist in rescue and recovery efforts. They were out that night and all the next day for those efforts. I also remember mom and other folk taking food to the workers.

Some names may now escape me but I believe the section gang foreman was Harry Morris and the Morley station master's last name was Fields. This info is most likely quite useless to your overall scheme of things but thought you'd want to know that L&N employees from the lowest levels were there to help.

(Webmaster's note: My Dad, H. E. Lea, said he knew D. C. Fields, Sr. and that he was actually the Station Agent at Morley TN. Mr. Fields had a son who also worked for the L&N. His name was D. C. Fields, Jr. and he later worked at a ly Station Agent at Alcoa TN.)


To follow is a letter I received around August 2007:

Earl C. Stewart
123 Plantation Way
Hawthorne FL 32640
1-532-481-3238

Dear Phil,

At your request enclosed is a picture taken in Camp Croft S. Carolina, a short time after the train wreck.

Some of the things that stand out in my memory. I was in the coach behind the kitchen car. Three of us had "odd man" to see who would sleep in the upper birth. When a black porter came through and said "This train cannot stay on the track going this fast." We laughed and I said "He's trying to scare us." They agreed, but he was heading to the back of the train. It was a short time after that we crashed.

Our car slammed into and was on top of the kitchen car and it (the kitchen car) was on fire. As far as I know now one was seriously hurt on our car. There was lots of screaming and hollering "HELP ME".

The first thing I thought of was getting help. I used to walk on railroad tracks to go fishing and I knew they had phones on some of the telephone poles. So I took off down the track to find one and maybe call for help. As I was running down the track a man was limping along. He asked me where I was going and I told him what I was going to do. He told me that he was a member of the train crew and he was going for the phone. He said "One is near here". He wanted me to go down the embankment to find it and he would make the call. When I found it I had to help him down the bank to the phone.

He said "You can go back and help get trapped men out". H....... (Note: That's all I have.)

NOTE: Earl called me on 04/23/2008 and sent me the following remainder of the letter:

All of the cars did not go off the tracks. The railroad people brought an engine down and hooked on to the cars and pulled us out to Lake City. At Lake City the people of the town was told we was coming. They came out to meet us. The women had made sandwiches along with pies and cake, hot coffee. The was the true spirit of the people's support of our military. A time that will be in my memory forever. Thanks to those wonderful people of Lake City.

We left Lake City, next stop Camp Croft South Carolina for basic training.


May 30, 2007

Dear Mr. Lea

Enclosed with this letter is material related to the Troop Train accident in Jellico Tennessee which occurred on July 6, 1944. My oldest brother, Don Masline, was one of those killed in that horrible accident.

I was only 9 years old at the time and do not remember many of the details, however another brother who was 16 at the time collected articles from many of the newspapers and that constitutes most of the material enclosed.

Just recently, he was on Google and found reference to your website. He then contacted me to see ifI had ever seen the information and I replied that I had not. After some discussion we agreed to send this material and hope you can utilize it in your website. Please note that we have included pictures of some of those for whom you are seeking photos.

In review of the articles, you will notice there were ten soldiers killed from Stark County in Ohio (Baird, Brown, D. Clark, Hill, Kiesling, Masline, Parker, Paumier, Shipbaugh, Wright) This was quite devastating to our area and in addition to those ten, there were many others injured and fortunately many unharmed. I note in reading the correspondence which the son of Ray Parker has sent, he indicated that his father lived near Waco not Trenton which is on the memorial.

I do remember that my mother, my father, Don's wife and I went to Jellico sometime after the accident and the picture of that scene has remained with me all of these years. In 1994, my wife and I were moving from Iowa to South Carolina for retirement and we stopped in Jellico. I first went to the police station and told them of my connection and asked how to get to the scene of the accident. They gave me the route and told me that I would meet with Jim Tidwell who was very much involved with the Memorial etc.

We went out and sure enough Jim was there and he took us to the sight. He explained that he was 16 at the time and was helping the night of the accident. He then took us to his house and told us more of what he was involved with. What a gentleman he was! I really appreciated his input.

My wife and I went to the downtown center of Jellico and saw the memorial. Jim was very instrumental in having this memorial and I find it interesting that the memorial pays tribute to not only those from Jellico who gave their lives during wartime but to those 33 men who were killed in the Troop Train Accident. We also purchased books from Mr. Ascher for each member of our family. I also purchased the video of the dedication ceremony for the memorial. This tape also includes the tossing of the wreath which is relative to the article of August 4, which I mention in the next sentence. Jim Tidwell and I kept in touch for a while and he sent me the articles from the LaFollette Press dated March 10, 1994 and August 4, 1994.

I am including another Newspaper clipping from the Canton Repository dated November 15, 1993. My sister in Canton sent this to me.

Hopefully, you will be able to include this material in your website, Chances are some of it is duplication, so use what you can. Keep up the good work and I hope word spreads of your efforts.

Sincerely.

Jim Masline
1069 Club Circle
Pawleys Island, SC 29585


The following is the transcript of an Mp3 file of survivor, Robert Funk, that he recorded for me and sent to me by his daughter-in-law, Debra J. Funk:

"My name is Robert Funk.
I was in this train wreck in 1944 outside of Jellico Tennessee.
There are some things in your report that is not exactly right.
I will tell you what happened to me and then you can take it from there.

We were not already trained. We had just been inducted at Fort Benjamin Harrison and were traveling, we found out later, to Camp Croft, South Carolina where we would receive seventeen weeks training before being sent overseas. I was riding in a troop sleeper which was like a boxcar with a door in the middle and with bunks inside. We had just gone to bed. I was in a lower bunk when suddenly we were, uh, the train started shaking and I hit the floor and then suddenly we stopped.

One of the boys opened the door to step out and he found out that there was nothing to step out to because our car was resting on the kitchen car which was up and down the bank and we had to go back into the car back of us in order to get out. By the time we got out the kitchen car was afire and which caught our car afire and it was like a furnace within a very few minutes. We had only the clothes we had on when we were sleeping. All the others burned up in the wreck. When we walked up the track and saw that looked like the engine which was supposed to go around the curve had just flew out into space and lit on its side down at the bottom of the gully. There was a Pullman car that had gone end over end down the embankment that tore loose all the bunks and uh.... Because they had just gone to bed everything was tore loose and boys were pinned in there and were hollering for help.

No one along the road going by on the other side of the gorge would stop. They would slow up. They could see the fire, but nobody stopped. We formed a double human chain up and down the thing and took out all of the boys that we could get out. But, we had no equipment, nothing but our bare hands. We passed them up on the tracks and laid them along the tracks and myself after a while I quit doing that because there wasn't too much we could do and I started going along the bank and praying with the boys who were there. And, one of the boys I knelt down to pray with him and I saw that he was dead. It was quite a shock. Me being just a young boy of twenty years old. I had never seen anything like this before.

They sent out an engine from Jellico and hooked on to the cars that were left on the track. We took and gathered up the boys that we had laid along the track and took them in the cars, laying them on the floor or any place that we could put them. I had the experience of having them tell me that there was a priest looking for me. Finally he came up to the window of the car that I was in and told me that the boys had so appreciated what I had done that he wanted to thank me. Of course that made me feel very good to know that I had done some good. We were pulled back to Jellico where we were loaded on another train and went on to Camp Croft, South Carolina for our training.

The stories of the ones that came and helped probably were helping those who were in that Pullman car which, in which the boys were pinned in and which we couldn't get everybody out. There was nobody there to help us while I was there. So, evidently, later on they got some people out there to help which I'm very glad because, as I said, all those bunks were pulled out and pinned the boys in. One boy I definitely remember was crying he'd give anything. "SAVE ME! SAVE ME! I'LL GIVE YOU ANYTHING!" But, we couldn't save him 'cause we had no equipment.

After seventeen weeks, uh, training we were given ten days delay enroute home and then we went home and were shipped overseas and I entered into the campaign in Belgium at the Battle of the Bulge and was there in the 1st Division. the 26th Regiment and we went on and when the war ended I was in Czechoslovakia.

I want to thank you for writing that article and having that picture 'cause I never saw a picture of that wreck. I had been told about it from many people but never had a chance to see a picture of it and never heard how many had died until I read your article and I thank you very much for it. If this adds anything to you for what you have done I hope that I have made some other things clear to you. And, again I thank you for bringing that article and a picture that my son and his wife got on the internet and was able to show me a picture of the wreck that I was in. I was in that car that is hanging over the edge. The door's in the center and I thank the good Lord I was able to get out and was able to help someone. Thank you again."

WOW! That was powerful!!
Thanks so much to Mr. Funk for his story and for his service to his country!!! (Phil)

Click HERE to visit the Debra Funk's genealogy website that will play this recording.


Date: Mon, 28 May 2007 17:54:38 -0400
Subject: Pictures of James E. Clark
From: "MARK MOORE" <MMOORE118@COMCAST.NET>
CC: alvabrenda@worldnet.att.net

Mr. Lea,

My wife found your website recently when one of my children was doing
research for an 8th grade Tennessee History research paper. My son had
chosen the train wreck because my grandfather was one of the ones killed in
the wreck. My wife noticed that my grandfather's picture was missing so I
decided to e-mail you a couple of the pictures that mom had given me.
My wife prefers the group picture over the other. If you would crop him
out of that picture that would be our preference. Thank you for the time you
have spent putting the website together.

Sincerely,

Mark Moore

            

 


From: Cynthiaries8@aol.com
Date: Wed, 23 May 2007 08:52:20 EDT
Subject: email from www.TroopTrain.com
 
In regards to the Troop Train accident, this was forwarded to me by my daughter-in-law. Joseph G. Shipbaugh of Canton, Ohio would have been my former father-in-law. I was married to his son (who was 4 years old at the time of his death) and we had 4 children before his death in 1975. His wife Ruth is still living at the age of 87. She re-married after his death and had 2 more children. Joseph would have had 6 grandchildren and 12 great grandchildren.

I will see if I can provide you with a photo.

This was very informative, and I have forwarded it to my children, so they can read about it. My oldest son visited the site in Tenn one year when he was on vacation.

Let me know if there is any other info that you would like to have.

Sincerely

Cynthia Shipbaugh Ries
North Canton, Ohio


The following article was written by Ray Smith and published 05-22-2007 at: www.oakridger.com

July 6, 1944: Oak Ridge responds to a troop train wreck

Author(s): D. Ray Smith Historically Speaking The Oak Ridger Date: May 22, 2007 Section: Community

Editor’s Note: This is the first in a series on this topic.

In late 1942, under the most unique and unusual circumstances, a city was born almost overnight, and 3,000 people had to find another place to live to accommodate the huge industrial effort to obtain sufficient quantity of Uranium 235 for an atomic bomb. Oak Ridge was born. In 1943 the city grew at an amazing pace never before seen.

The Oak Ridge community was a gated city, a “Secret City,” as it was not on any map and badges were required of all who sought to enter the military area known to various people first as the Kingston Demolition Range, then the Clinton Engineer Works, and The Manhattan Project in Tennessee, and finally Oak Ridge.

The local people had no idea what was going on. They wondered about these unusual people coming to live where their small communities once proudly stood. Yet the surrounding communities knew by word of mouth that something very important was being done there and that it had to do with the war effort. Occasionally the surrounding communities interacted with the new and most unusual “Secret City,” and often officials in surrounding cities exchanged communications with the military officers there.

This unusual collection of young energetic and educated individuals were placed in the midst of several communities of Appalachia that had been settled starting a century and a half ago by a mixture of people seeking freedom and independence without the crowded conditions of the coastal cities. They took the land from the Cherokees through various treaty negotiations and by just living on the land they wanted. Over the years, a proud heritage had developed in the area which was typified by the Overmountain Men’s victory at King’s Mountain.

A fiercely independent people who were, at the same time, strongly patriotic toward the young United States lived in the ridges and valleys of East Tennessee. It is these people who were removed in November and December 1942 with little notice and less consideration to make way for the new wave of highly educated and singularly focused people, the main leaders of whom knew their effort was dedicated to winning a race for the very life of the planet.

These few individuals, both the leaders and the primary scientists and engineers, understood the stakes. They knew the awful danger the world faced if they could not be the first to create an atomic bomb. Many other workers came only knowing that whatever it was that was being done in this secret location was extremely important. It is in this setting that the following story of uncommon valor in the face of danger and response to the need for help is set.

In researching the 1944 train wreck which is the subject for Historically Speaking, I had two primary sources for this material: Bill Sergeant, the person who personally went to Jellico late in the night as one of the leaders in the response from Oak Ridge to the Jellico Troop Train Wreck on July 6, 1944; and Scott Chippendale, a volunteer with the Oak Ridge Chapter of the American Red Cross.

Bill provided information about the troop train wreck and recalled for me the tremendously strong impressions he received about the enormous damage done by the train wreck. He quickly told me that the night he spent there helping organize the assistance remains a vivid memory firmly planted in his mind.

During the research for this column, I found a Web site that is dedicated to the memory of the famous troop train wreck: www.trooptrain.com, titled “My Tribute to the… WWII Troop Train Wreck of July 6, 1944” by Phil Lea of Benton, Tenn. This Web site is extremely informative, with photographs of many of those who died as well as several of the survivors of the train wreck. Phil has also done an excellent job of documenting the train wreck.

This project has grown significantly and will require more column space than I first imagined. I hope you will enjoy the final product as much as I am enjoying learning the details about the train wreck and the response by Oak Ridge. It is yet another source of great pride in our city’s support for our neighbors that started during the earliest months of the Manhattan Project’s Clinton Engineer District.

Some details about the ill-fated train and the awful wreck will help put perspective on this disaster, often mentioned as one of the nation’s major troop train accidents and placed in the top 25 United Sates railway accidents of all time. The overwhelming response by the citizens of Jellico and surrounding communities will make you proud to be a part of this special part of our country.

A southbound Louisville-Nashville passenger train derailed at approximately 9 p.m. on Thursday evening, July 6, 1944, and plunged into the approximately 50-foot-deep Clear Fork River gorge at a place known as the Jellico Narrows. The train, No. 47, a south-bound second-class passenger train, consisted of steam engine No. 418, four Pullman tourist cars, one Pullman kitchen car, one Pullman troop-sleeping car, two Pullman tourist cars, one baggage car, three Pullman troop-sleeping cars, one Pullman kitchen car, two Pullman troop-sleeping cars and one baggage car, in the order named. All 16 cars were of steel construction.

The train was transporting new army recruits (the exact number is unknown to me as my research has found numbers ranging from 400 to 1006) from Virginia to Camp Croft, S.C. However, this was not common knowledge, as the exact destination of the train was kept secret.

In Cincinnati, a strange thing happened that surprised the riders in the last tourist car. A new locomotive, number 418, backed up to the car that was the last in line when they arrived. Some of these riders may well have chosen the last passenger car because of it being the last one and thus thought by some to be the safest place to ride on a train.

Then in Corbin, Ky., another change may have taken place. Engineer John C. (Lyle) Rollins and fireman John William Tummins, both of Etowah, Tenn., had both just completed a 16-hour shift, and after the required eight-hour rest were now working this train back toward Tennessee. They could not know they had boarded and were running their last train. One reference indicated that another engineer was scheduled to have replaced Rollins at Corbin but did not show up. Later, Tummins would indicate that something happened at Corbin, Ky., that upset Rollins.

The change in terrain along the railroad right of way coming south out of Kentucky and entering Tennessee is dramatic. The Kentucky portion of the track is rather level with few curves and none of them with significant enough degree to present a hazard to a train traveling at a rather high rate of speed.

However, the curve where steam engine No. 418 left the track, taking four additional railcars with it to the bed of Clear Fork River and derailing four more railcars, is said to be the worst curve in the entire L&N railroad line. The curve is a specified 10 degrees (actually measured to be a little over an 11-degree curve) and is the point at which a train coming south at a high rate of speed (above 35 mph) would be expected to naturally wreck.

In the coming weeks we will examine the various investigations into the reason for the train wreck and the response Oak Ridge made to the disaster. We will look at an FBI investigation into sabotage, two accounts of the Oak Ridge Manhattan District response to the disaster, the Interstate Commerce Commission report, and several newspaper accounts of the epic event. We will also look at the Red Cross response and the history of the origin of the Red Cross in Oak Ridge.


From: Bengecld@aol.com
Date: Tue, 22 May 2007 16:54:41 EDT
Subject: email from www.TroopTrain.com

I was eleven years old and lived in Morley, Tn. About four miles from the train wreck.
My Dad took my brother and I to a movie in Jellico And arrived at the train wreck around
10:p.m just minuets after . 25 W was blocked and we had to stay all night
It was a Double header (2 Engines).

Claude Benge


From: "Ray Smith" <draysmith@comcast.net> Add to Address Book Add Mobile Alert
To: drwebman@yahoo.com
Subject: email from www.TroopTrain.com
Date: Wed, 16 May 2007 22:35:40 -0400

Phil,

I am Ray Smith, historian in Oak Ridge , TN. I write a weekly column for our local newspaper, The Oak Ridger. From: "Ray Smith" <draysmith@comcast.net> Add to Address Book Add Mobile Alert
To: drwebman@yahoo.com
Subject: email from www.TroopTrain.com
Date: Wed, 16 May 2007 22:35:40 -0400

Phil,

I am Ray Smith, historian in Oak Ridge , TN. I write a weekly column for our local newspaper, The Oak Ridger. www.oakridger.com The column is known as Historically Speaking. You can see example articles by going to the newspaper web site and searching for “Historically Speaking.”

I am now writing a column on the historic train wreck at High Cliffs, TN near Jellico , TN. Your web page is a gold mine of information. I plan to reference your web page in the newspaper article. I need about three photographs to illustrate the columns. I plan to publish the story in about two or three weekly columns. Could you please send me some high resolution images that I might use in the newspaper? In particular, I would like to have images of the wreck site and Brakeman, John William Tummins. Of course, I would credit you with providing the images for my use.

 The column is known as Historically Speaking. You can see example articles by going to the newspaper web site and searching for “Historically Speaking.”

I am now writing a column on the historic train wreck at High Cliffs, TN near Jellico , TN. Your web page is a gold mine of information. I plan to reference your web page in the newspaper article. I need about three photographs to illustrate the columns. I plan to publish the story in about two or three weekly columns. Could you please send me some high resolution images that I might use in the newspaper? In particular, I would like to have images of the wreck site and Brakeman, John William Tummins. Of course, I would credit you with providing the images for my use.

Ray Smith
 


 

On March 12th, 2007 I received the nicest letter from Joy McKinney and two pictures of her brother, Charles T. Clapp

 

3-9-07
149 Dreyfus Rd.
Berea, KY 40403

Dear Sir:
I am writing in the regards of the Troop Train Wreck of 1944. We have been to the scene of the accident twice & we also saw the memorial in fact we took pictures as I told you on the phone Charles Clapp was my brother he too was scalded to death & it meant so much to see where he lost his life & also to know that there is still people out there who care enough to have a memorial in their homes. We would have liked to have been able to read the writing on the rock but couldn't get close enough. I am enclosing two pictures of Charles & if you still have one of your books please send it to me and I'll send a check back for it. Since I have seen where his life was taken it's like a weight is lifted off of my shoulders & I know he is at rest.

Thanks again
for caring about our Service
boys & girls.
Joy E. McKinney

 


 


From: "Billilyn Friese" <jbfriese@astound.net>
Subject: troop train victim
Date: Tue, 12 Sep 2006 22:57:18 -0700
Mr. Lea,

Just visited your Tribute again.  It has been two years since I looked 
at it.  The emails you received were quite a surprise.  I am the youngest 
child of Ray W. (Billy) Parker.  He was from the Canton area, not Trenton as
reported, having grown up in Waynesburg.  Dad and Mom were living in 
the Moreland addition near Waco at the time of his death.  I have an older
sister and brother.  Having been born six months after Dad's death, I 
am also Billi Parker.  I have attached a newspaper clipping my Grandmother
saved. Until finding your wonderful site and tracking down and talking to John
Ascher, we had so little information.  Through your site I have found 
one of the wreck survivors living just an hours drive away.  He has become a 
valued friend.
Thank your for your tribute.

Billi Parker Friese
Concord, CA



August 23, 2006

Dear Mr. Lea,

Enclosed is a picture of my Grandfather, Chalmer Fields. He was in the Troop Train wreck in Jellico, Tennessee. He is still living in Sidney, Ohio. I can remember the story of the wreck that he told to me as a child. In June we visited the Troop Train Wreck Memorial in Jellico and took pictures of his Great-Grandsons standing in front of it. Please add his picture to your website. Thank you.

Sincerely,

 

Julie Huelskamp

bjhuelskamp@aol.com


To:
From: "Nancy McNamara Schnebly" <nanmcnamaravo@mac.com> 
Subject: email from www.TroopTrain.com 
Date: Sat, 15 Jul 2006 13:37:52 -0700 

Dear Mr. Lea,

I am directing a play called "See Rock City" by Arlene Hutton and the 
train wreck of July 6, 1944 is mentioned in the story line. So, I 
searched on the internet to learn more about it and was brought to 
your website.

Thank you so very much for providing this wonderful tribute to the 
men who died. I was moved to see all the photos as well.

The play "See Rock City" is set in Corbin, Kentucky in 1944-45. I 
live in Los Angeles, so websites like yours have been invaluable to 
me in my research of this time period and this place.

Just wanted to let you know and to say thank you.

All the best,

Nan McNamara


To:
Date: Mon, 3 Jul 2006 07:19:03 -0700 (PDT) 
From: "Nicky Gibson" <nickygib@yahoo.com> 
Subject: Train Wreck? 
To: drwebman@yahoo.com 

Hello, I have a great uncle who was on the Jellico train wreck, and I noticed his name is not on your survivor's list. His name is Jack Arnett from Royalton, KY and he went and saw the memorial for the first time since the wreck last week. If you could email me back if you need any information about him. Thank you for the wonderful memorial website.

Nicky
Salyersville, KY


Date: Mon, 3 Jul 2006 07:19:03 -0700 (PDT) 
From: "Nicky Gibson" <nickygib@yahoo.com> 
To:
Subject: Train Wreck? 

Hello, I have a great uncle who was on the Jellico train wreck, and I noticed his name is not on your survivor's list. His name is Jack Arnett from Royalton, KY and he went and saw the memorial for the first time since the wreck last week. If you could email me back if you need any information about him. Thank you for the wonderful memorial website.

Nicky
Salyersville, KY


From: "Mary Lou Hudson" <hudgo@medt.com>  
Subject: Re: Troop Train Wreck (Transcribed by Mary Lou Hudson / Newspaper Articles) 
Date: Tue, 30 May 2006 13:14:50 -0500 

Hi Phil,

I have pasted below the newspaper articles I transcribed on the Jellico, TN train wreck. You are welcome to use the articles on your website. - Mary Lou Hudson



Oelwein Daily Register, Oelwein, Iowa - July 7, 1944
Troop Train Wreck Toll 17
Jellico, Tenn. -- UP -- Rescue workers recovered the bodies of 17 persons today from the splintered wreckage of a troop train that plunged into a rock strewn mountain gorge while speeding around the curve last night.
Two of the dead were the engineer and fireman. The remainder were understood to be soldiers.
The army said the wreck occurred while the soldiers were preparing to retire for the night. Many of them were in washrooms, separated from their clothes and personal property, which made identification slow.
Many of the dead soldiers were found in a coach which was crushed beneath the coal tender as they plunged into a hollow mountain stream.
Daylight aided the rescue workers who were pulling apart the debris of the splintered coaches in the narrow gorge which was strewn with sharp rocks.
More than _00 (?) soldiers were injured.
The men were crushed in the in the cars when the train left the track while rounding a curve at high speed. The engine careened into a gorge, pulling six coaches with it. Ten other cars did not overturn.
The dead included J.C. Rollings, the engineer, and J.W. Tummins, fireman, both of Etowah, Tenn. Names of the dead soldiers were withheld pending notification of relatives. Maj. Harold Tyler, public relations officer for the Fourth Service Command, said the train was en route from Cincinnati to Knoxville.
Scores of townspeople from this village of 2,000 and neighboring farmers rushed to the scene with floodlights, flashlights and lanterns to assist in searching for the dead and injured.
Many of those hurt were treated in clearings beside the roadbed. Jellico's only hospital
was filled and cots were placed in hallways to accommodate the injured.
Ambulances carried many to nearby towns for treatment. The Office of Civilian Defense and the Red Cross immediately mobilized units to assist the injured and to aid in clearing the tracks of wreckage.
Jellico is 60 miles from Knoxville and is near the Kentucky state line.


The Charleston Daily Mail, Charleston, West Virginia - July 7, 1944
Troop Train's Plunge Into Gorge Claims 17
200 Injured When Engine, 6 Coaches Topple From Rails at Sharp Curve
Jellico, Tenn. (AP). -- At least 17 persons, including 15 soldiers and the engineer and fireman of a Louisville and Nashville passenger train, were killed and more than 200 injured in the train's plunge into the gorge of the Clear river -- 11 miles south of here last night.
Work of extricating the victims from the locomotive and fire cars which tumbled down the steep 50-foot bank to the shallow stream while rounding a curve was slow and unofficial estimates placed the causalities as high as 25 dead and 250 hurt.
The train was a special carrying only soldiers and the train crew.
An emergency train made up from the 12 cars which did not leave the track left this morning taking 50 of the injured to Lake City, Tenn., en route to the government hospital at Oak Ridge, Tenn., and at least 39 others were sent to Oak Ridge hospital in ambulances.
State Guard Company C from Knoxville, commanded by Captain Ben Sanders, joined military police in patrolling the wreck scene as acetylene torches were used to cut away portions of the cars and slings and pulleys were used to move the injured men up the bank.
The kitchen and baggage cars of the southbound train, reported carrying more than 1,000 soldiers just out of basic training, were burned. 
Express Agent C.L. Alley of Jellico said first rescues were made by nearby mountainfolk who tediously hoisted the injured by block and tackle slings up the shrubbery-lined gorge. Waiting ambulances rushed the injured to hospitals in Lake City, Lafollette and Jellico, and Corbin
and Williamsburg, Ky.
Rescuers worked doggedly to free two soldiers trapped in one of the smashed coaches. Doctors gave blood plasma transfusions to one of them, pinned down in the wreckage. Two others who had been trapped were extricated, one of them dead.
The fireman, identified at a Jellico hospital as J.W. Tummins, of Etowah, died several hours after he was hurled free of the wreckage.
Reporter Willard Yarbrough of the Knoxville Journal telephoned his paper that he counted seven dead when he climbed into the engine room and looked out. He said two more were lying in the stream, running two to four feet deep at the wreck scene.
"One soldier pinned in the wreckage cried 'get me out of here or let me die right here'" Yarbrough said. "Another soldier being carried across the stream on a stretcher asked his rescuers to let him die right there."
The engineer identified by the railroad as John C. Rollins, of Etowah, Tenn., was "somewhere beneath his engine," Yarbrough said.
Pvt. Wallace Lewis of Canton, O., a passenger on one of the car hurled into the gorge said, "I saw a big flash, and someone said 'there's going to be a wreck.' There was. I crawled out of the car, fell into the shallow creek, and then stumbled out."
In this Cumberland mountain section on the Kentucky-Tennessee line, the L. and N. tracks transverse numerous trestles over deep gorges and loop around hairpin turns.
Ten army doctors and 12 army ambulances were rushed to the scene from Clinton. They carried amply supplies of blood plasma.
Express Agent Alley, who said the train carried 1,006 soldiers, reported early today the cars remaining upright had been switched to another track and were proceeding to their destination.


The Charleston Daily Mail, Charleston, West Virginia - July 9, 1944
Train Death Toll Likely to Pass 19
Jellico, Tenn. (UP) -- The official death toll of the troop train derailment which plunged five coaches into a mountain gorge remained at 19 Saturday night but army authorities feared a few more bodies might be found in a smashed car partially buried in Clear river.
Seventeen of the dead were servicemen and two were trainmen. More than 100 soldiers, who had been inducted only a few days before, were injured.
An investigation was underway by FBI agents and army and railroad officials.


The Charleston Daily Mail, Charleston, West Virginia - July 10, 1944
Soldiers Die in Wreck
Jellico, Tenn. (AP). -- Two soldiers from Randolph county, W. Va., were listed by army officials over the week-end as among the dead in a troop train wreck near Jellico Thursday night. 
They were Robert C. Clingeman of Elkins and James W. Buchanan, Huttonsville, W. VA.



The Chillicothe Constitution, Chillicothe, Missouri - July 8, 1944
Train Wreck Death List May Reach 25
Police Chief Roberts of Jellico, Tenn., Says 21 bodies Have Been Removed.
Jellico, Tenn., July 8. -- Wrecking crews amidst smashed coaches of a shattered troop train removed additional bodies of soldiers early today and Night Police Chief Elmer Roberts said the death toll apparently was at least twenty-five.
Roberts said twenty-one bodies had been lifted up the steep sides of the mountain gorge where a Louisville and Nashville train left the track Thursday night and four more had been located in the wreckage.
The Army had not changed its list of known dead --- 19.
Cause of the wreck under investigation by the F.B.I.

 

 


Date: Tue, 30 May 2006 06:15:20 -0700 (PDT) 
From: "jim lizer" <jim_lizer2000@yahoo.com> 
Subject: The WWII Troop Train Wreck... 

Good morning Phil,

I am sorry for calling you so early this morning, but I have been kinda moved about this since I have had the opportunity to read 
through you site. I was up most of last night reading the names of The victims and the survivors as well as the accounts of the incident.

This morning I took a minute or ten and made a couple of phone calls. My grandfather was one of the soldiers on that train. He was in one of the cars that ended up in the river. His name, the same as mine, is Jim Lizer. His given name is Emory George Lizer, but everyone called him Jimmy.
My Father's name is Larry James Lizer, but everyone called him Jimmy. When I was born, my grandmother told my mom that it didn't matter what they named me, they were going to call me Jimmy. So, my mom shortcut the entire program and just named me James Mitchell Lizer, and everyone calls me Jimmy. I didn't feel like fighting the system either, and named my son James Mitchell Lizer II, and everyone calls him Jimmy. I go through this lineage to help authenticate your father's account of the story of the Jellico troop train crash, as well as to authenticate myself and my slight changes to the story.

As I read through the accounts of the accident, there is talk of my grandfather holding his brother-in-law, Virgil Marshall, by the hair of his head and keeping him from drowning. Here in lies the rub, My Uncle Virgil, who was also on the train was Virgil Eversole, not Virgil Marshall. That is My Grandmother's (Hazel Lizer) sister's (Beatrice Eversole) husband. Thus making him my Grandfather's brother-in-law. The boys were on their way to their first duty station, and My Grandfather ended up in the 102nd Infantry Division. My uncle Virgil ended up getting out of the Army and coming home due to severe shoulder injuries. 

The injuries that my uncle sustained were from the Jellico train crash. You see, it was he that held my grandfather by the hair until they could be rescued, not the other way around. The amount of damage caused to his shoulder was great enough to preclude him from continuing with his service. The department of the Army seems to have rules about that or something. My Grandfather went on to serve at the Battle of the Bulge and earned the Bronze star for Valor. He is still with us and we just had our family pictures taken this past Sunday for my Grandparent's 65th wedding anniversary. Unfortunately, my Uncle Virgil passed away in 1999.

I thank you and your father for writing the story of these soldiers and for keeping their memories alive. I hope to have the opportunity to ask my grandfather more about the accident. Being a 20 year veteran of the Army myself, my Grandfather has always been a little more open with me about stories from the war than he has been with others in the family. My father was in the Army as well and their example and service were the motivation for my joining in the first place and for going as far as I did with my own service. As you and your father have so eloquently stated, these were brave young men and I am personally proud of everything that they went on to accomplish in their lives once they left Jellico.

I would like to thank you again for all of your efforts. I just wanted to take the time to set a couple of items of the story straight for the record, and to thank you for all of your efforts. I will pass along some more photos of both my Grand father and of my Uncle 
Virgil.

Thanks again,

JIM LIZER

Jim Lizer, Realtor
Exclusive Buyer's Representative
RE/MAX Keystone Realty
jim_lizer2000@yahoo.com
Office: 330-867-6587 x18
Fax: 330-867-9657
Other: 330-645-6075


Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2006 17:06:15 -0800 (PST) 
From: "Deb" <debjfunk@yahoo.com> 
Subject: Correct Shipping Address 

Mr. Lea,
We have been answering your emails but apparently you aren't receiving them. Hopefully, you will receive this one. Yes, the shipping address is the correct address, as that is my father in laws address. We were sending him the book as a gift. He doesn't know about it.
Robert J. Funk
1554 Beacon Drive
Port Charlotte, FL 33952

I have attached a photo of my father in law.. His name is Robert J. Funk.
He was in the car that was left on the ledge, would've been next one over.

Debra J. Funk


Robert J. Funk

1554 Beacon Drive
Port Charlotte, FL 33952


Date: Sat, 25 Feb 2006 18:54:56 -0800 (PST) 
From: "Mike, Shirley + Sierrah" <m.shuman@sbcglobal.net> 
Subject: email from www.TroopTrain.com.com 


i called the ph# you have on this pg but they never heard of you. my mother and her sister info on the train wreck. please respond to this email. thank you shirley


From: "William Alquist" <walqui1@lsu.edu> 
To: phil@drtrain.com 
Date: Thu, 09 Feb 2006 23:13:06 -0600 
Subject: Troop train accident 

This is a picture of my great uncle, Russell Alquist. I am glad to see there is a site devoted to these guys! 
The only time I ever saw my grandfather cry was when he talked about this accident. 

Will Alquist

Russell Alquist


CC: "'Ryan Smalley'" wittcap97@columbus.rr.com  
Subject: email from www.TroopTrain.com  
Date: Sat, 1 Oct 2005 11:58:50 -0400 


Dear Phil

My father, Edgar M. Smalley, was on the train heading for Camp Croft in S.C. on July 6, 1944. I remember taking him to the bus at the Mercer County Courthouse in Celina, OH on June 28. I was almost 3 years old and celebrated my birthday on July 4th just 2 days before the train crash. My mother didn't know if dad was dead or alive when my grandfather called to tell us that there had been a train wreck. His story later was that he had boarded one of the cars where many were killed, but someone came along and said to move to one of the rear cars......that probably saved his life. One spring in the 50's on a family trip to Florida we passed that area of the ravine near Jellico and he pointed it out to us. Thanks to Clarence Eckstein's recent article in the "Celina Daily Standard" September 28, your website was given and I have been able to read other accounts of this tragedy. Ed passed away on Oct. 3, 1989 at the age of 70. I would like to honor him with this for your website. Thanks so much.
Sincerely
Charlotte Smalley Ricard
Mendon, OH

Note:
The picture was taken at Camp Croft, Spartanburg, S. C. The flag said RTC 38C He did not have to go overseas to fight and was kept back to train others. After the war ended he was sent to Japan. I believe he was spared twice.


Date: Thu, 29 Sep 2005 23:20:01 -0700 (PDT) 
From: "David Hudson" <g2ordo4n@yahoo.com> 
Subject: Troop Train Wreck Info 

Hello Sir,
My name is David Hudson. The reason I am e-mailing you is about your website on the troop train wreck. My
grandfather is Arlston Roach, when he was a young boy he was at the site of the wreck. There is a picture
that was printed in a newspaper from that time with him sitting on a rock at the scene. He always told me
this story. But years ago we were in Lafollette visiting family and he took me into a Barber Shop were
this newspaper was hanging on the wall and sure enough he was the little boy sitting on the rock he has told
me about for years. The barber refused to sell him the paper. Is there anyway you can get that newspaper or
picture. It means a lot to him and myself. We live in Calumet City, IL my phone number is (708) 862-0992 my
cell phone is (708) 257-1183. Thank you so much


From: Rockiedog60@wmconnect.com 
Date: Wed, 28 Sep 2005 10:18:02 EDT 
Subject: Re: picture of my father 

Phil 

My sister requested that I send you a picture of my father who was in the troop train wreck of July 6,1944 at Clear Fork Canyon. My father Houston B. Kelley was inducted 6/28/1944 at Ft. Benjamin Harrison Ind. where he boarded a troop train going to Camp Croft S.C. for training. While in route along with two of his friends Hargis Salyer, and Raymond Combs. Hargis stated to my father that the train was going to derail if it didn't slow down. Dad said that Hargis had no more than made the statement when it derailed. My father was in the car behind the tender laying on its side, he managed to climb out window with help from others. A piece of metal had punctured his liver and he was taken to Oak Ridge Hospital then from there to Moore Gen. Hospital Swannanoa, North Carolina. My father was discharged Sept. 1, 1944 with nervous condition and drew a small pension for about three year, when the Veterans Administration reviewed his case and determined that his disability was not incurred while in the Military and discontinued his pension Nov 30,1947. My father was never in good health after that tragic day of the train wreck, and was constantly in and out of the veterans hospital. If I can be of any other help please Write or e-mail 
Kenneth H. Kelley 
2327 Calico Rd. 
Berea, Ky 40403 
khkpk60@wmconnect.com 


Houston Butler Kelley


To: suemike_anderson@hotmail.com
Subject: Arthur Leroy Wilson
Date: Mon, 26 Sep 2005 08:04:21 -0700 (PDT)

re: http://www.drwebman.com/trooptrainwreck/ 
Hi Sue,
If I've not yet asked, do you have a pic of your father in his Army uniform (or from that era) you an send me to put on my website?
Thank you,
Phil
-------------------------------------------------
Sue Anderson <suemike_anderson@hotmail.com> wrote:

Let me know if this is what you are looking for and that you received it.
Thanks
Sue
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
To: Sue Anderson <suemike_anderson@hotmail.com>
Subject: www.TroopTrain.com RE: Arthur Leroy Wilson 1944
Date: Mon, 26 Sep 2005 18:31:47 -0700 (PDT)

Hi Sue,
Those are great!
(Do you know if any of his pictured buddies were on the train with him???)
Thank you,
Phil
ps: I now have a new domain and he'll be on it: www.TroopTrain.com 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
From: "Sue Anderson" <suemike_anderson@hotmail.com> 
Subject: RE: www.TroopTrain.com RE: Arthur Leroy Wilson 1944 
Date: Wed, 28 Sep 2005 08:31:38 -0700 

Yes that was Ray W. Parker. All of those in the picture lived in the Waynesburg area with Dad. They all knew each other and were friends. Played Baseball together. Bumgard was one of them but mom can not remember much about him except that dad knew him well.

Sue

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
To: Sue Anderson <suemike_anderson@hotmail.com>
Subject: RE: www.TroopTrain.com RE: Arthur Leroy Wilson 1944
Date: Tue, 27 Sep 2005 14:32:51 -0700 (PDT)

Hi Sue,
It is so cool you have those pics.
Is "Billy" the "Ray W. Parker" of Trenton, Ohio listed as dying in the accident???
Any idea who "Bumgard" was? (1st or last name???)
Thanks so much,
Phil
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
To: Sue Anderson <suemike_anderson@hotmail.com>
Subject: RE: www.TroopTrain.com RE: Arthur Leroy Wilson 1944
Date: Tue, 27 Sep 2005 14:32:51 -0700 (PDT)

Hi Sue,
It is so cool you have those pics.
Is "Billy" the "Ray W. Parker" of Trenton, Ohio listed as dying in the accident???
Any idea who "Bumgard" was? (1st or last name???)
Thanks so much,
Phil
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Sue Anderson <suemike_anderson@hotmail.com> wrote:

As we understand it all were on the train but in different cars. Jimmy held his brother-in-law Virgil Marshall by the hair of his head up out of the water to keep him from drowning. Pulled all the muscles in his shoulder & arm.

Billy died later in the hospital. What happened to the rest my mom can not remember. We do know Billy's parents had been to see him and my Dads parents were driving them home since they flew in. But on the way home they were stopped and brought back to the hospital because Billy had died. My grandparents then went on home. 

Dad & Billy were at the Jelico hospital because they were so badly hurt. The others went to other hospitals. Dad was considered the worst one hurt that lived. At least that is what he was told. 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
From: "Sue Anderson" <suemike_anderson@hotmail.com> 
Subject: Another victim of the train wreck 
Date: Sun, 24 Oct 2004 08:50:48 -0700 

My father, Arthur Leroy Wilson, was in that train wreck. According to the information we received, My father was the worst one hurt that lived. He was placed with the dead ones until they discovered he was still alive. He had broken back, legs and the list goes on. They told him he would never walk. He told them he would and could not accept not walking. He did not say this as nicely as I stated but he did eventually walk. He limped from that time on. He had lots of problems with circulation and other circulatory problems the rest of his life. 

He died Feb 18, 1996 in a car accident. He received partial benefits and received 100 percent disability prior to his death. He was a very proud man and would not try to get benefits until he really needed them. Because of 
this pride, my mother could not get her benefits at his death. His records were burned that could have proved the extent of his injuries. Those lives that were destroyed, the destruction still continues today to the families of these men because of "lost" records.

The AMVETS rep Richard Miller seemed bored & disinterested when we went to him for help. When heard back from the Department of Veterans affairs, they declined her benefits. Then a letter came from Richard Miller and he stated he agreed with this decision. It also stated that we had tried once before to get these benefits but we had not. We responded that fraud might be involved if someone tried to get benefits. My mom decided just to let it go.

Thanks for listening 

This next article was sent to me by Douglas Eckstein and I believe transcribed from the 
Christian Journal-Leader
, Vol 3, Issue 9, Friday August 26, 2005, Jellico, TN

Survivor returns to Jellico 61 years later
 by Jake Bennett, Jellico Tourism Director 


Survivor: 
Clarence L. Eckstein
(circa 1944)

Survivor: 
Clarence L. Eckstein
(circa 2005)

After a 61 year absence, Clarence L. Eckstein of Celina, Ohio returned to Jellico. July 6, 1944 just after 9 p.m. Eckstein was one of many soldiers on his way to South Carolina before being shipped to Germany. Just after Eckstein had just bedded down in the Pullman car directly behind the dining car, tragedy struck as the troop train left the tracks and plummeted into the black depth of the Clearfork River Gorge known as the “Narrows.” The sound must have been deafening as the Pullmans and other cars began piling into the river on top of each other. The rear of the sleeping car came to rest at the same level as the rail tracks, but was being held upright over the river gorge by a car that was standing on its end in the river bed. Eckstein’s head nearly broke through the wall in front of his bed. He was so dazed that he hardly remembers being escorted out the rear of the car by other survivors of the tragedy. The twisted and burning cars, nearly 100 feet below in the river bed, claimed 44 lives and injured hundreds more. This is the United States single most deadly non-combat military tragedy. Eckstein returned to the scene recently and from about 100 feet away at a memorial plaque across from the site on Highway 25W, he again thanked God for stopping the car he was riding from the disasters of the other cars below him. Eckstein was sent on to South Carolina and was shipped to Germany and was involved in a number of major battles in that country.

Eckstein is a true hero and is carrying on the tradition of an annual reunion with his old comrades. This year the reunion is in Louisville, KY. Eckstein now 81 years old, came to Jellico with his wife, daughter and son in law and visited the site of the tragedy. He also visited the memorial in Jellico’s Veterans Park. As he stood there looking at the names of his departed comrades that are engraved in the marble, one could see the loss that he feels in his heart. Eckstein says he would like to return to Jellico again someday to reminisce the tragedy and again thank God for looking down on him that fateful night 61 years ago. 

If you would like to contact Clarence, here is his  email: clbex@adelphia.net 


I found this posting online:

I was a soldier in the troop train that derailed in the vicinity of Jellico in June, 1944. Did your newspaper cover that wreck and would you have an old copy I could buy? 
Robert Baynes <111725@msn.com>
Citrus Heights, California USA - Fri Aug 2 14:20:06 2002


From : "Robert Baynes" 111725@msn.com
Subject : train wreck 1944 
Date : Wed, 12 Nov 2003 14:55:50 -0800 

Phil Lea

I was a draftee on the train that derailed and wrecked at Jellico, Tennessee--in one of the cars that went into the gorge. I have received, via the internet, an indication that you may have access to information concerning that accident. Specifically, I would be interested in obtaining a copy of the book "She Jumped The Tracks" which I understand is in the possession of your father. I will gladly pay any costs involved in the duplication and mailing of the document. Secondly, I might be interested in buying a copy of the video related to the wreck if I had a little more information---What is included in the video? There were no video cameras at that time. How much of the video is about the wreck (time wise) and how much concerns other historical data about Tennessee? 

Bob Baynes
E-mail 111725@msn.com 


From: "Robert/Carol Baynes" 111725@msn.com 
To: drwebman@yahoo.com 
Subject: 1944 Troop Train Wreck 
Date: Tue, 13 Sep 2005 16:04:35 -0700 

Phil Lea:

Was surprised to get your e-mail! I started my search for the 1944 wreck information about three years ago. I received many responses from a variety of people but not one from anyone who had been in the wreck. One person did send me an e-mail of your article which I read with great interest. Ultimately I was connected with John P. Ascher who had written a book on the disaster, but when I spoke with him he said that the book was out of print. Believe it or not another of my correspondents said that he thought he saw it on E-bay and lo and behold I bid on it and was able to buy it. I suppose most of the people involved in the accidents have forgotten about it or are dead. Anyway, the book is quite detailed and includes quite a few pictures.

Recently my wife and I visited the site at Jellico and I was surprised that the gorge was as deep as it was--I don't remember because it happened about 9:30 at night.
My story is as follows: I was inducted into the army immediately upon graduation from high school in Mantua, Ohio and went to Fort Ben Harrison in Indiana. Ultimately we were put on a train for transportation to basic training but we didn't know where. The date was July 6,1944 and the trip was uneventful up until about 9:30 that evening. I was in an upper bunk and thought to myself that the train seemed to be going very fast. All of a sudden the car I was in started to tip sideways, so I grabbed a bar overhead and hung on. When the car stopped, it was lying on its side and we started climbing out the windows. I climbed up the side of the gorge to the tracks and helped others trying to do the same. Ultimately I was ordered to deliver records to a hospital in Jellico which I did -- I don't remember how I got back down the hill and across the gorge and back up the other side to the closest road but I did. The next day those of us that were not injured were put another train and we continued on our journey. I ended up at Camp Croft, South Carolina and after completing basic training went on to officer candidate school at Fort Benning, Georgia. The picture I'm sending obviously was taken after I was commissioned. John Ascher has printed additional copies of his book and I'm sure you would enjoy reading it if you haven't already done so. If the picture doesn't go thru, let me know and I'll send one by mail.



Bob Baynes
7517 Quail Vista Lane
Citrus Heights, CA 95610
916 723 8001 


From: "Charlie Sheets" <cesheets@charter.net> 
Subject: drwebman.com/trooptrainwreck 
Date: Tue, 5 Apr 2005 08:57:42 -0500 

Phil:

I just happened to stumble upon your tribute page regard the troop train accident and found it an interesting read. However, being interested in seeing what the Commissioner of the former Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) had to report on it, I done the research and found the official ICC report. Not knowing if you are aware of this accident report, please navigate to the following link, where, if you click on the year 1944, you will find said report...

http://dotlibrary2.specialcollection.net/scripts/ws.dll?websearch&site=dot_railroads

Charlie Sheets


From: ship@eohio.net 
Subject: Jellico Train Wreck
Date: Wed, 30 Mar 2005 19:43:07 GMT

Phil,
I just found your website regarding the Jellico troop train wreck. My 
grandfather perished in that accident (if it can be termed an accident) 
and I believe he was in the first or second coach back from the tender. 
His name was Joseph G. Shipbaugh, from Canton, Ohio. The monument and 
the book both list his middle initial as E., but this is incorrect (his 
middle name was Grant).

Thank you so much for your tribute to these men, both those lost and 
those who survived.

Joseph G. Shipbaugh IV
East Rochester,
Ohio



From: DMurtz@aol.com  
Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 21:18:19 EST 
Subject: (Troop Train wreck)
To: phil@drtrain.com 


THE STORY ON THE TRAIN WRECK SURE BROUGHT BACK SOME HORRID MEMORIES.
I WAS IN THAT MESS. 

BEFORE I WAS DRAFTED, I WORKED AS A FIREMAN ON THE PENN. R.R... 
I WAS THE GUY THAT TOLD MY BUNK MATE (HE WAS IN THE UPPER) THAT THE ENGINEER MISSED A DYNAMITE CAP. HE HIT TWO AND NEVER SIGNALED. THEN I TOLD HIM THAT IF WE DID NOT SLOW DOWN WE WERE GOING TO LEAVE THE TRACKS. YOU COULD FEEL THE WHEELS LIFT OFF THE TRACKS AND THEN SET BACK DOWN. ABOUT 3 OR 4 MIN. LATER WE WERE IN THE BOTTOM OF THE GORGE. THERE WERE THREE PASSENGER CARS AT THE BOTTOM TWO ON THERE SIDE AND OURS ACROSS THE TOP OF THEM. ONE GI STOOD IN THE CREEK (IN THE HOT WATER AND LET US CLIMB DOWN HIS BACK. WE FOUND OUT LATER HE HAD A CRUSHED VERTEBRAE. HE WAS FROM ALLIANCE OHIO MY HOME TOWN.

THE TRAIN WAS GOING FROM CORBIN KY. TO CAMP CROFT S.C. FOR BASIC TRAINING.
THE INJURED WITH ME WERE TAKEN TO OAK RIDGE TENN. AT THAT TIME NO ONE HAD ANY IDEA WHAT WAS THERE NOT EVEN THE PEOPLE THAT WORKED THERE, BUT THAT IS ANOTHER STORY.

I THOUGHT YOU WOULD LIKE TO KNOW.

DMURTZ@AOL.COM

murtz_dick

Richard J. (Dick) Murtz
BRANCH OF SERVICE: U.S. Army

HOMETOWN: Alliance, OH 

ACTIVITY DURING WWII: 
MEMBER OF THE 10TH MOUNTAIN DIVISION. WOUNDED APRIL 18, 1945. RECEIVED PURPLE HEART. 

---------------------------------

From: DMurtz@aol.com   Date:
Tue, 1 Mar 2005 20:49:08 EST
Subject: Re: Troop Train Wreck http://www.drwebman.com/trooptrainwreck/
To: drwebman@yahoo.com


I HAVE NO PICTURES. THE ONLY THING I CAME OUT OF THE WRECK WITH WAS MY G.I. SHORTS. AND A LOT OF MEMORIES. YOU CAN USE ANY OF THIS AS YOU SEE FIT. 

THE PART OF THE STORY TO WIND THIS UP WAS OUR TRIP TO OAK RIDGE TN.
THEY LOADED US IN GI AMBULANCES AND WE WENT SAILING TO OAK RIDGE HOSPITAL TO RECUPERATE.
THIS WAS A TIME WHEN NO ONE HAD ANY IDEA WHAT WAS THERE. NOT EVEN PEOPLE WORKING THERE .
EVERYTHING IN THIS CAMP WAS FREE TO ALL. THE CAFETERIA HAD A SPREAD YOU WOULD NOT BELIEVE
THREE CHOICES OF MEAT FOR BREAKFAST AND THE OTHER MEALS WERE ALSO UNREAL.
I TOLD ONE OF THE GUYS I DONT KNOW WHY I HEARD G.I.'s COMPLAINING ABOUT THE ARMY FOOD. I FOUND OUT LATER WHEN WE GOT TO CAMP CROFT S.C.

WHILE I WAS AT OAK RIDGE THEY ASKED ME IF I HAD MET A GUY BY THE NAME OF RED MADDOX /MATTOX (SP?) I SAID YES WE TALKED AT THE CAMP IN INDIANA BEFORE WE GOT ON THE TRAIN. THEY TOLD ME THEY HAD TWO BODIES IN THE MORGUE THAT THE NEEDED TO I.D. WE GOT IN A STAFF CAR AND STARTED INTO TOWN.
WE STOPED AT THREE GATES ON THE WAY OUT AND GOT PAPERS AT EACH GATE IN TRIPLICATE. WE WERE TOLD TO BE BACK BEFORE DARK OR NOT TO EVEN TRY TO GET BACK IN.

ALL THE BODIES WERE LAID OUT ON THE FLOOR AND SO BLOATED YOU HAD A HARD TIME MAKING OUT FACIAL FEATURES. I HAD TO GET DOWN AN LOOK UP THE SIDE OF THE FACE AND I COULD SEE THE RED HAIR ROOTS AND HE HAD A FRESH HAIR CUT I GAVE THIS TO THE LT. AND HE SAID THAT WAS FINE NOW THEY KNEW WHO THE OTHER GI WAS. I SAW RED IN THE BARBER SHOP IN IND.

THIS WILL STICK WITH ME THE REST OF MY LIFE.
I STILL THINK THE TRAIN CREW WAS UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF SOMETHING OR THEY WOULD HAVE SOUNDED THE HORN WHEN THE HIT THE CAPS ON THE TRACK. THEY MAY HAVE FALEN ASLEEP IF WE WERE SUPOSED TO CHANGE CREWS IN CORBIN KY.

 BEST TO YOU AND THE FINE PEOPLE THAT HELPED US. 
IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS THAT I HAVE NOT COVERED LET ME KNOW.

DICK MURTZ   


Jim Hatcher
PO Box 241
La Follette, TN 37766

Jan. 15, 2005

Hi Phil:

I figure I can get this in the mail to you easier than I can set on line and type it, so here goes. 

First let me tell you a little about myself, keeping this in mind, will make my account of the troop train wreck more understandable.
I was born in Williamsburg, Kentucky, and at the time of this wreck, I was 5 years old, and living just south of Williamsburg in a little community called, Savoy, Ky. This train wreck made quite an impression on me as a child, because I can still remember it today.

My father and my grandfather both worked for the L&N Railroad, so like yourself, I grew up around railroads and trains most of my life. My dad, H.E. "Gene" Hatcher, was a clerk and later on changed over to a cook for the rail gang that was laying what they called the ribbon rail in the late 60's and early 70's. Those were the days of the camp cars, when the men would live all week in the coaches at the job site. Dad and his gang spent a lot of time in and around Ocoee and your area. Your dad may have known my dad. My Grandfather, on my mother's side was George Henry "Dutch" Klein. He was section gang foreman, and his territory was from Jellico, Ky to Emlyn, Ky, south of Williamsburg. He lived in one of the section houses that the railroad then provided,
in Saxton, Ky.

I remember one of our neighbors drove my parents and me over to the site of the wreck. We were not allowed to stop, and were told to keep moving. It was a sad and tragic thing to see even from the highway. My grandfather and his men were down in the river with others, helping to get the dead and injured out. They worked day and night.

We lived near the tracks at Savoy, the main line was directly in back of our house, also two storage tracks. When they got all of the coaches and engine out of the river, they pulled them into the storage yard there at Savoy. My dad took me down to the tracks and we walked through the different coaches. I still remember how twisted and mangled the interiors were.

After my grandfather retired, and I was older, I asked him what he thought might have caused that train to wreck. He stated that speed was probably the major factor, and this put so much pressure on the pilot wheels of the engine that the flange or flanges on the wheels broke off causing it to jump the tracks.

I now live in La Follette, TN. about 10 or 12 miles south of the wreck site. Have lived here since 1953. My dad retired from the L & N in 1973 and passed away in 1976. 

I don't know if I have given you any info that you didn't already know, but I have enjoyed sharing it with you, and if there is any part of this letter you may want to add to your website, feel free to do so, you have my permission! Also, let me say that I enjoy visiting your other web sites, and I love the Harley!!! 

Stay in touch, and best of luck to you and your family. 
Jim Hatcher


From: "NORMA COLE" <necole4@msn.com> 
To: phil@drtrain.com 
Subject: trooptrain wreck of 44 
Date: Tue, 28 Dec 2004 13:40:54 -0600 

Hello Phil,
My name is Norma Cole, my husbands' father Raymond Cole was on that train and died there in Jellico 2 days after the wreck. I am writing to see if it is possible for me to obtain a copy of she jumped the track if at all possible if so please let me know what the cost would be.
Thank you very much

Mrs. Larry Ray Cole 
Brazil, In 


From: "NORMA COLE" <necole4@verizon.net>
To: phil@drtrain.com 
Date: Tue, 28 Dec 2004 10:02:58 -0600 

Hello Phil,
My name is Norma Cole, my husbands' father died 2 days after that crash there in Jellico, he was in that train crash. I was wondering if you had any copies of "she jumped the tracks" left. My husbands' fathers name was Raymond (Ray) Cole.
Could you please let me know if you do and if you don't have any copies left how we can acquire one, would love to be able to give this bit of heritage to my husband and his siblings.
Thank You Very Much
Norma Cole
Brazil, In


From: "Sue Anderson" suemike_anderson@hotmail.com 
To: phil@drtrain.com 
Subject: Another victim of the train wreck 
Date: Sun, 24 Oct 2004 08:50:48 -0700 

My father, Arthur Leroy Wilson, was in that train wreck. According to the information we received, My father was the worst one hurt that lived. He was placed with the dead ones until they discovered he was still alive. He had broken back, legs and the list goes on. They told him he would never walk. He told them he would and could not accept not walking. He did not say this as nicely as I stated but he did eventually walk. He limped from that time on. He had lots of problems with circulation and other circulatory problems the rest of his life. 

He died Feb 18, 1996 in a car accident. He received partial benefits and received 100 percent disability prior to his death. He was a very proud man and would not try to get benefits until he really needed them. Because of this pride, my mother could not get her benefits at his death. His records were burned that could have proved the extent of his injuries. Those lives that were destroyed, the destruction still continues today to the families of these men because of "lost" records.


The AMVETS rep Richard Miller seemed bored & disinterested when we went to him for help. When heard back from the Department of Veterans affairs, they declined her benefits. Then a letter came from Richard Miller and he stated he agreed with this decision. It also stated that we had tried once before to get these benefits but we had not. We responded that fraud might be involved if someone tried to get benefits. My mom decided just to let it go. 


Thanks for listening


Arthur Leroy Wilson
(circa 1944)


Subject: drwebman.com/trooptrainwreck 
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 09:38:58 -0500 
From: "Kathy Howard" Kathy_Howard@berea.edu 
To: phil@drtrain.com 

My father was on the Troop Train Wreck July 6, 1944.  He survived the 
wreck but passed away in 1976 at the young age of 54.  I am very much 
interested in the video you have for sale.  Can you give me specific 
information as to what is in the video?

Kathy Howard
Berea Kentucky


 

SHE JUMPED THE TRACKS BOOK FOR SALE

The book: SHE JUMPED THE TRACKS
It is Out Of Print,

Phil Lea
868 Benton Station Road
Benton TN 37307


 

Date: Mon, 28 May 2007 17:54:38 -0400
Subject: Pictures of James E. Clark
From: "MARK MOORE" <MMOORE118@COMCAST.NET>
CC: alvabrenda@worldnet.att.net

Mr. Lea,

My wife found your website recently when one of my children was doing
research for an 8th grade Tennessee History research paper. My son had
chosen the train wreck because my grandfather was one of the ones killed in
the wreck. My wife noticed that my grandfather's picture was missing so I
decided to e-mail you a couple of the pictures that mom had given me.
My wife prefers the group picture over the other. If you would crop him
out of that picture that would be our preference. Thank you for the time you
have spent putting the website together.

Sincerely,

Mark Moore

            

 


From: Cynthiaries8@aol.com
Date: Wed, 23 May 2007 08:52:20 EDT
Subject: email from www.TroopTrain.com
 
In regards to the Troop Train accident, this was forwarded to me by my daughter-in-law. Joseph G. Shipbaugh of Canton, Ohio would have been my former father-in-law. I was married to his son (who was 4 years old at the time of his death) and we had 4 children before his death in 1975. His wife Ruth is still living at the age of 87. She re-married after his death and had 2 more children. Joseph would have had 6 grandchildren and 12 great grandchildren.

I will see if I can provide you with a photo.

This was very informative, and I have forwarded it to my children, so they can read about it. My oldest son visited the site in Tenn one year when he was on vacation.

Let me know if there is any other info that you would like to have.

Sincerely

Cynthia Shipbaugh Ries
North Canton, Ohio


The following article was written by Ray Smith and published 05-22-2007 at: www.oakridger.com

July 6, 1944: Oak Ridge responds to a troop train wreck

Author(s): D. Ray Smith Historically Speaking The Oak Ridger Date: May 22, 2007 Section: Community

Editor’s Note: This is the first in a series on this topic.

In late 1942, under the most unique and unusual circumstances, a city was born almost overnight, and 3,000 people had to find another place to live to accommodate the huge industrial effort to obtain sufficient quantity of Uranium 235 for an atomic bomb. Oak Ridge was born. In 1943 the city grew at an amazing pace never before seen.

The Oak Ridge community was a gated city, a “Secret City,” as it was not on any map and badges were required of all who sought to enter the military area known to various people first as the Kingston Demolition Range, then the Clinton Engineer Works, and The Manhattan Project in Tennessee, and finally Oak Ridge.

The local people had no idea what was going on. They wondered about these unusual people coming to live where their small communities once proudly stood. Yet the surrounding communities knew by word of mouth that something very important was being done there and that it had to do with the war effort. Occasionally the surrounding communities interacted with the new and most unusual “Secret City,” and often officials in surrounding cities exchanged communications with the military officers there.

This unusual collection of young energetic and educated individuals were placed in the midst of several communities of Appalachia that had been settled starting a century and a half ago by a mixture of people seeking freedom and independence without the crowded conditions of the coastal cities. They took the land from the Cherokees through various treaty negotiations and by just living on the land they wanted. Over the years, a proud heritage had developed in the area which was typified by the Overmountain Men’s victory at King’s Mountain.

A fiercely independent people who were, at the same time, strongly patriotic toward the young United States lived in the ridges and valleys of East Tennessee. It is these people who were removed in November and December 1942 with little notice and less consideration to make way for the new wave of highly educated and singularly focused people, the main leaders of whom knew their effort was dedicated to winning a race for the very life of the planet.

These few individuals, both the leaders and the primary scientists and engineers, understood the stakes. They knew the awful danger the world faced if they could not be the first to create an atomic bomb. Many other workers came only knowing that whatever it was that was being done in this secret location was extremely important. It is in this setting that the following story of uncommon valor in the face of danger and response to the need for help is set.

In researching the 1944 train wreck which is the subject for Historically Speaking, I had two primary sources for this material: Bill Sergeant, the person who personally went to Jellico late in the night as one of the leaders in the response from Oak Ridge to the Jellico Troop Train Wreck on July 6, 1944; and Scott Chippendale, a volunteer with the Oak Ridge Chapter of the American Red Cross.

Bill provided information about the troop train wreck and recalled for me the tremendously strong impressions he received about the enormous damage done by the train wreck. He quickly told me that the night he spent there helping organize the assistance remains a vivid memory firmly planted in his mind.

During the research for this column, I found a Web site that is dedicated to the memory of the famous troop train wreck: www.trooptrain.com, titled “My Tribute to the… WWII Troop Train Wreck of July 6, 1944” by Phil Lea of Benton, Tenn. This Web site is extremely informative, with photographs of many of those who died as well as several of the survivors of the train wreck. Phil has also done an excellent job of documenting the train wreck.

This project has grown significantly and will require more column space than I first imagined. I hope you will enjoy the final product as much as I am enjoying learning the details about the train wreck and the response by Oak Ridge. It is yet another source of great pride in our city’s support for our neighbors that started during the earliest months of the Manhattan Project’s Clinton Engineer District.

Some details about the ill-fated train and the awful wreck will help put perspective on this disaster, often mentioned as one of the nation’s major troop train accidents and placed in the top 25 United Sates railway accidents of all time. The overwhelming response by the citizens of Jellico and surrounding communities will make you proud to be a part of this special part of our country.

A southbound Louisville-Nashville passenger train derailed at approximately 9 p.m. on Thursday evening, July 6, 1944, and plunged into the approximately 50-foot-deep Clear Fork River gorge at a place known as the Jellico Narrows. The train, No. 47, a south-bound second-class passenger train, consisted of steam engine No. 418, four Pullman tourist cars, one Pullman kitchen car, one Pullman troop-sleeping car, two Pullman tourist cars, one baggage car, three Pullman troop-sleeping cars, one Pullman kitchen car, two Pullman troop-sleeping cars and one baggage car, in the order named. All 16 cars were of steel construction.

The train was transporting new army recruits (the exact number is unknown to me as my research has found numbers ranging from 400 to 1006) from Virginia to Camp Croft, S.C. However, this was not common knowledge, as the exact destination of the train was kept secret.

In Cincinnati, a strange thing happened that surprised the riders in the last tourist car. A new locomotive, number 418, backed up to the car that was the last in line when they arrived. Some of these riders may well have chosen the last passenger car because of it being the last one and thus thought by some to be the safest place to ride on a train.

Then in Corbin, Ky., another change may have taken place. Engineer John C. (Lyle) Rollins and fireman John William Tummins, both of Etowah, Tenn., had both just completed a 16-hour shift, and after the required eight-hour rest were now working this train back toward Tennessee. They could not know they had boarded and were running their last train. One reference indicated that another engineer was scheduled to have replaced Rollins at Corbin but did not show up. Later, Tummins would indicate that something happened at Corbin, Ky., that upset Rollins.

The change in terrain along the railroad right of way coming south out of Kentucky and entering Tennessee is dramatic. The Kentucky portion of the track is rather level with few curves and none of them with significant enough degree to present a hazard to a train traveling at a rather high rate of speed.

However, the curve where steam engine No. 418 left the track, taking four additional railcars with it to the bed of Clear Fork River and derailing four more railcars, is said to be the worst curve in the entire L&N railroad line. The curve is a specified 10 degrees (actually measured to be a little over an 11-degree curve) and is the point at which a train coming south at a high rate of speed (above 35 mph) would be expected to naturally wreck.

In the coming weeks we will examine the various investigations into the reason for the train wreck and the response Oak Ridge made to the disaster. We will look at an FBI investigation into sabotage, two accounts of the Oak Ridge Manhattan District response to the disaster, the Interstate Commerce Commission report, and several newspaper accounts of the epic event. We will also look at the Red Cross response and the history of the origin of the Red Cross in Oak Ridge.


From: Bengecld@aol.com
Date: Tue, 22 May 2007 16:54:41 EDT
Subject: email from www.TroopTrain.com

I was eleven years old and lived in Morley, Tn. About four miles from the train wreck.
My Dad took my brother and I to a movie in Jellico And arrived at the train wreck around
10:p.m just minuets after . 25 W was blocked and we had to stay all night
It was a Double header (2 Engines).

Claude Benge


From: "Ray Smith" <draysmith@comcast.net> Add to Address Book Add Mobile Alert
To: drwebman@yahoo.com
Subject: email from www.TroopTrain.com
Date: Wed, 16 May 2007 22:35:40 -0400

Phil,

I am Ray Smith, historian in Oak Ridge , TN. I write a weekly column for our local newspaper, The Oak Ridger. From: "Ray Smith" <draysmith@comcast.net> Add to Address Book Add Mobile Alert
To: drwebman@yahoo.com
Subject: email from www.TroopTrain.com
Date: Wed, 16 May 2007 22:35:40 -0400

Phil,

I am Ray Smith, historian in Oak Ridge , TN. I write a weekly column for our local newspaper, The Oak Ridger. www.oakridger.com The column is known as Historically Speaking. You can see example articles by going to the newspaper web site and searching for “Historically Speaking.”

I am now writing a column on the historic train wreck at High Cliffs, TN near Jellico , TN. Your web page is a gold mine of information. I plan to reference your web page in the newspaper article. I need about three photographs to illustrate the columns. I plan to publish the story in about two or three weekly columns. Could you please send me some high resolution images that I might use in the newspaper? In particular, I would like to have images of the wreck site and Brakeman, John William Tummins. Of course, I would credit you with providing the images for my use.

 The column is known as Historically Speaking. You can see example articles by going to the newspaper web site and searching for “Historically Speaking.”

I am now writing a column on the historic train wreck at High Cliffs, TN near Jellico , TN. Your web page is a gold mine of information. I plan to reference your web page in the newspaper article. I need about three photographs to illustrate the columns. I plan to publish the story in about two or three weekly columns. Could you please send me some high resolution images that I might use in the newspaper? In particular, I would like to have images of the wreck site and Brakeman, John William Tummins. Of course, I would credit you with providing the images for my use.

Ray Smith
 


 

On March 12th, 2007 I received the nicest letter from Joy McKinney and two pictures of her brother, Charles T. Clapp

 

3-9-07
149 Dreyfus Rd.
Berea, KY 40403

Dear Sir:
I am writing in the regards of the Troop Train Wreck of 1944. We have been to the scene of the accident twice & we also saw the memorial in fact we took pictures as I told you on the phone Charles Clapp was my brother he too was scalded to death & it meant so much to see where he lost his life & also to know that there is still people out there who care enough to have a memorial in their homes. We would have liked to have been able to read the writing on the rock but couldn't get close enough. I am enclosing two pictures of Charles & if you still have one of your books please send it to me and I'll send a check back for it. Since I have seen where his life was taken it's like a weight is lifted off of my shoulders & I know he is at rest.

Thanks again
for caring about our Service
boys & girls.
Joy E. McKinney

 


 


From: "Billilyn Friese" <jbfriese@astound.net>
Subject: troop train victim
Date: Tue, 12 Sep 2006 22:57:18 -0700
Mr. Lea,

Just visited your Tribute again.  It has been two years since I looked 
at it.  The emails you received were quite a surprise.  I am the youngest 
child of Ray W. (Billy) Parker.  He was from the Canton area, not Trenton as
reported, having grown up in Waynesburg.  Dad and Mom were living in 
the Moreland addition near Waco at the time of his death.  I have an older
sister and brother.  Having been born six months after Dad's death, I 
am also Billi Parker.  I have attached a newspaper clipping my Grandmother
saved. Until finding your wonderful site and tracking down and talking to John
Ascher, we had so little information.  Through your site I have found 
one of the wreck survivors living just an hours drive away.  He has become a 
valued friend.
Thank your for your tribute.

Billi Parker Friese
Concord, CA



August 23, 2006

Dear Mr. Lea,

Enclosed is a picture of my Grandfather, Chalmer Fields. He was in the Troop Train wreck in Jellico, Tennessee. He is still living in Sidney, Ohio. I can remember the story of the wreck that he told to me as a child. In June we visited the Troop Train Wreck Memorial in Jellico and took pictures of his Great-Grandsons standing in front of it. Please add his picture to your website. Thank you.

Sincerely,

 

Julie Huelskamp

bjhuelskamp@aol.com


To:
From: "Nancy McNamara Schnebly" <nanmcnamaravo@mac.com> 
Subject: email from www.TroopTrain.com 
Date: Sat, 15 Jul 2006 13:37:52 -0700 

Dear Mr. Lea,

I am directing a play called "See Rock City" by Arlene Hutton and the 
train wreck of July 6, 1944 is mentioned in the story line. So, I 
searched on the internet to learn more about it and was brought to 
your website.

Thank you so very much for providing this wonderful tribute to the 
men who died. I was moved to see all the photos as well.

The play "See Rock City" is set in Corbin, Kentucky in 1944-45. I 
live in Los Angeles, so websites like yours have been invaluable to 
me in my research of this time period and this place.

Just wanted to let you know and to say thank you.

All the best,

Nan McNamara


To:
Date: Mon, 3 Jul 2006 07:19:03 -0700 (PDT) 
From: "Nicky Gibson" <nickygib@yahoo.com> 
Subject: Train Wreck? 
To: drwebman@yahoo.com 

Hello, I have a great uncle who was on the Jellico train wreck, and I noticed his name is not on your survivor's list. His name is Jack Arnett from Royalton, KY and he went and saw the memorial for the first time since the wreck last week. If you could email me back if you need any information about him. Thank you for the wonderful memorial website.

Nicky
Salyersville, KY


Date: Mon, 3 Jul 2006 07:19:03 -0700 (PDT) 
From: "Nicky Gibson" <nickygib@yahoo.com> 
To:
Subject: Train Wreck? 

Hello, I have a great uncle who was on the Jellico train wreck, and I noticed his name is not on your survivor's list. His name is Jack Arnett from Royalton, KY and he went and saw the memorial for the first time since the wreck last week. If you could email me back if you need any information about him. Thank you for the wonderful memorial website.

Nicky
Salyersville, KY


From: "Mary Lou Hudson" <hudgo@medt.com>  
Subject: Re: Troop Train Wreck (Transcribed by Mary Lou Hudson / Newspaper Articles) 
Date: Tue, 30 May 2006 13:14:50 -0500 

Hi Phil,

I have pasted below the newspaper articles I transcribed on the Jellico, TN train wreck. You are welcome to use the articles on your website. - Mary Lou Hudson



Oelwein Daily Register, Oelwein, Iowa - July 7, 1944
Troop Train Wreck Toll 17
Jellico, Tenn. -- UP -- Rescue workers recovered the bodies of 17 persons today from the splintered wreckage of a troop train that plunged into a rock strewn mountain gorge while speeding around the curve last night.
Two of the dead were the engineer and fireman. The remainder were understood to be soldiers.
The army said the wreck occurred while the soldiers were preparing to retire for the night. Many of them were in washrooms, separated from their clothes and personal property, which made identification slow.
Many of the dead soldiers were found in a coach which was crushed beneath the coal tender as they plunged into a hollow mountain stream.
Daylight aided the rescue workers who were pulling apart the debris of the splintered coaches in the narrow gorge which was strewn with sharp rocks.
More than _00 (?) soldiers were injured.
The men were crushed in the in the cars when the train left the track while rounding a curve at high speed. The engine careened into a gorge, pulling six coaches with it. Ten other cars did not overturn.
The dead included J.C. Rollings, the engineer, and J.W. Tummins, fireman, both of Etowah, Tenn. Names of the dead soldiers were withheld pending notification of relatives. Maj. Harold Tyler, public relations officer for the Fourth Service Command, said the train was en route from Cincinnati to Knoxville.
Scores of townspeople from this village of 2,000 and neighboring farmers rushed to the scene with floodlights, flashlights and lanterns to assist in searching for the dead and injured.
Many of those hurt were treated in clearings beside the roadbed. Jellico's only hospital
was filled and cots were placed in hallways to accommodate the injured.
Ambulances carried many to nearby towns for treatment. The Office of Civilian Defense and the Red Cross immediately mobilized units to assist the injured and to aid in clearing the tracks of wreckage.
Jellico is 60 miles from Knoxville and is near the Kentucky state line.


The Charleston Daily Mail, Charleston, West Virginia - July 7, 1944
Troop Train's Plunge Into Gorge Claims 17
200 Injured When Engine, 6 Coaches Topple From Rails at Sharp Curve
Jellico, Tenn. (AP). -- At least 17 persons, including 15 soldiers and the engineer and fireman of a Louisville and Nashville passenger train, were killed and more than 200 injured in the train's plunge into the gorge of the Clear river -- 11 miles south of here last night.
Work of extricating the victims from the locomotive and fire cars which tumbled down the steep 50-foot bank to the shallow stream while rounding a curve was slow and unofficial estimates placed the causalities as high as 25 dead and 250 hurt.
The train was a special carrying only soldiers and the train crew.
An emergency train made up from the 12 cars which did not leave the track left this morning taking 50 of the injured to Lake City, Tenn., en route to the government hospital at Oak Ridge, Tenn., and at least 39 others were sent to Oak Ridge hospital in ambulances.
State Guard Company C from Knoxville, commanded by Captain Ben Sanders, joined military police in patrolling the wreck scene as acetylene torches were used to cut away portions of the cars and slings and pulleys were used to move the injured men up the bank.
The kitchen and baggage cars of the southbound train, reported carrying more than 1,000 soldiers just out of basic training, were burned. 
Express Agent C.L. Alley of Jellico said first rescues were made by nearby mountainfolk who tediously hoisted the injured by block and tackle slings up the shrubbery-lined gorge. Waiting ambulances rushed the injured to hospitals in Lake City, Lafollette and Jellico, and Corbin
and Williamsburg, Ky.
Rescuers worked doggedly to free two soldiers trapped in one of the smashed coaches. Doctors gave blood plasma transfusions to one of them, pinned down in the wreckage. Two others who had been trapped were extricated, one of them dead.
The fireman, identified at a Jellico hospital as J.W. Tummins, of Etowah, died several hours after he was hurled free of the wreckage.
Reporter Willard Yarbrough of the Knoxville Journal telephoned his paper that he counted seven dead when he climbed into the engine room and looked out. He said two more were lying in the stream, running two to four feet deep at the wreck scene.
"One soldier pinned in the wreckage cried 'get me out of here or let me die right here'" Yarbrough said. "Another soldier being carried across the stream on a stretcher asked his rescuers to let him die right there."
The engineer identified by the railroad as John C. Rollins, of Etowah, Tenn., was "somewhere beneath his engine," Yarbrough said.
Pvt. Wallace Lewis of Canton, O., a passenger on one of the car hurled into the gorge said, "I saw a big flash, and someone said 'there's going to be a wreck.' There was. I crawled out of the car, fell into the shallow creek, and then stumbled out."
In this Cumberland mountain section on the Kentucky-Tennessee line, the L. and N. tracks transverse numerous trestles over deep gorges and loop around hairpin turns.
Ten army doctors and 12 army ambulances were rushed to the scene from Clinton. They carried amply supplies of blood plasma.
Express Agent Alley, who said the train carried 1,006 soldiers, reported early today the cars remaining upright had been switched to another track and were proceeding to their destination.


The Charleston Daily Mail, Charleston, West Virginia - July 9, 1944
Train Death Toll Likely to Pass 19
Jellico, Tenn. (UP) -- The official death toll of the troop train derailment which plunged five coaches into a mountain gorge remained at 19 Saturday night but army authorities feared a few more bodies might be found in a smashed car partially buried in Clear river.
Seventeen of the dead were servicemen and two were trainmen. More than 100 soldiers, who had been inducted only a few days before, were injured.
An investigation was underway by FBI agents and army and railroad officials.


The Charleston Daily Mail, Charleston, West Virginia - July 10, 1944
Soldiers Die in Wreck
Jellico, Tenn. (AP). -- Two soldiers from Randolph county, W. Va., were listed by army officials over the week-end as among the dead in a troop train wreck near Jellico Thursday night. 
They were Robert C. Clingeman of Elkins and James W. Buchanan, Huttonsville, W. VA.



The Chillicothe Constitution, Chillicothe, Missouri - July 8, 1944
Train Wreck Death List May Reach 25
Police Chief Roberts of Jellico, Tenn., Says 21 bodies Have Been Removed.
Jellico, Tenn., July 8. -- Wrecking crews amidst smashed coaches of a shattered troop train removed additional bodies of soldiers early today and Night Police Chief Elmer Roberts said the death toll apparently was at least twenty-five.
Roberts said twenty-one bodies had been lifted up the steep sides of the mountain gorge where a Louisville and Nashville train left the track Thursday night and four more had been located in the wreckage.
The Army had not changed its list of known dead --- 19.
Cause of the wreck under investigation by the F.B.I.

 


Date: Tue, 30 May 2006 06:15:20 -0700 (PDT) 
From: "jim lizer" <jim_lizer2000@yahoo.com> 
Subject: The WWII Troop Train Wreck... 

Good morning Phil,

I am sorry for calling you so early this morning, but I have been kinda moved about this since I have had the opportunity to read 
through you site. I was up most of last night reading the names of The victims and the survivors as well as the accounts of the incident.

This morning I took a minute or ten and made a couple of phone calls. My grandfather was one of the soldiers on that train. He was in one of the cars that ended up in the river. His name, the same as mine, is Jim Lizer. His given name is Emory George Lizer, but everyone called him Jimmy.
My Father's name is Larry James Lizer, but everyone called him Jimmy. When I was born, my grandmother told my mom that it didn't matter what they named me, they were going to call me Jimmy. So, my mom shortcut the entire program and just named me James Mitchell Lizer, and everyone calls me Jimmy. I didn't feel like fighting the system either, and named my son James Mitchell Lizer II, and everyone calls him Jimmy. I go through this lineage to help authenticate your father's account of the story of the Jellico troop train crash, as well as to authenticate myself and my slight changes to the story.

As I read through the accounts of the accident, there is talk of my grandfather holding his brother-in-law, Virgil Marshall, by the hair of his head and keeping him from drowning. Here in lies the rub, My Uncle Virgil, who was also on the train was Virgil Eversole, not Virgil Marshall. That is My Grandmother's (Hazel Lizer) sister's (Beatrice Eversole) husband. Thus making him my Grandfather's brother-in-law. The boys were on their way to their first duty station, and My Grandfather ended up in the 102nd Infantry Division. My uncle Virgil ended up getting out of the Army and coming home due to severe shoulder injuries. 

The injuries that my uncle sustained were from the Jellico train crash. You see, it was he that held my grandfather by the hair until they could be rescued, not the other way around. The amount of damage caused to his shoulder was great enough to preclude him from continuing with his service. The department of the Army seems to have rules about that or something. My Grandfather went on to serve at the Battle of the Bulge and earned the Bronze star for Valor. He is still with us and we just had our family pictures taken this past Sunday for my Grandparent's 65th wedding anniversary. Unfortunately, my Uncle Virgil passed away in 1999.

I thank you and your father for writing the story of these soldiers and for keeping their memories alive. I hope to have the opportunity to ask my grandfather more about the accident. Being a 20 year veteran of the Army myself, my Grandfather has always been a little more open with me about stories from the war than he has been with others in the family. My father was in the Army as well and their example and service were the motivation for my joining in the first place and for going as far as I did with my own service. As you and your father have so eloquently stated, these were brave young men and I am personally proud of everything that they went on to accomplish in their lives once they left Jellico.

I would like to thank you again for all of your efforts. I just wanted to take the time to set a couple of items of the story straight for the record, and to thank you for all of your efforts. I will pass along some more photos of both my Grand father and of my Uncle 
Virgil.

Thanks again,

JIM LIZER

Jim Lizer, Realtor
Exclusive Buyer's Representative
RE/MAX Keystone Realty
jim_lizer2000@yahoo.com
Office: 330-867-6587 x18
Fax: 330-867-9657
Other: 330-645-6075


Date: Sun, 26 Feb 2006 17:06:15 -0800 (PST) 
From: "Deb" <debjfunk@yahoo.com> 
Subject: Correct Shipping Address 

Mr. Lea,
We have been answering your emails but apparently you aren't receiving them. Hopefully, you will receive this one. Yes, the shipping address is the correct address, as that is my father in laws address. We were sending him the book as a gift. He doesn't know about it.
Robert J. Funk
1554 Beacon Drive
Port Charlotte, FL 33952

I have attached a photo of my father in law.. His name is Robert J. Funk.
He was in the car that was left on the ledge, would've been next one over.

Debra J. Funk


Robert J. Funk
1554 Beacon Drive
Port Charlotte, FL 33952


Date: Sat, 25 Feb 2006 18:54:56 -0800 (PST) 
From: "Mike, Shirley + Sierrah" <m.shuman@sbcglobal.net> 
Subject: email from www.TroopTrain.com.com 


i called the ph# you have on this pg but they never heard of you. my mother and her sister info on the train wreck. please respond to this email. thank you shirley


From: "William Alquist" <walqui1@lsu.edu> 
To: phil@drtrain.com 
Date: Thu, 09 Feb 2006 23:13:06 -0600 
Subject: Troop train accident 

This is a picture of my great uncle, Russell Alquist. I am glad to see there is a site devoted to these guys! 
The only time I ever saw my grandfather cry was when he talked about this accident. 

Will Alquist

Russell Alquist


CC: "'Ryan Smalley'" wittcap97@columbus.rr.com  
Subject: email from www.TroopTrain.com  
Date: Sat, 1 Oct 2005 11:58:50 -0400 


Dear Phil

My father, Edgar M. Smalley, was on the train heading for Camp Croft in S.C. on July 6, 1944. I remember taking him to the bus at the Mercer County Courthouse in Celina, OH on June 28. I was almost 3 years old and celebrated my birthday on July 4th just 2 days before the train crash. My mother didn't know if dad was dead or alive when my grandfather called to tell us that there had been a train wreck. His story later was that he had boarded one of the cars where many were killed, but someone came along and said to move to one of the rear cars......that probably saved his life. One spring in the 50's on a family trip to Florida we passed that area of the ravine near Jellico and he pointed it out to us. Thanks to Clarence Eckstein's recent article in the "Celina Daily Standard" September 28, your website was given and I have been able to read other accounts of this tragedy. Ed passed away on Oct. 3, 1989 at the age of 70. I would like to honor him with this for your website. Thanks so much.
Sincerely
Charlotte Smalley Ricard
Mendon, OH

Note:
The picture was taken at Camp Croft, Spartanburg, S. C. The flag said RTC 38C He did not have to go overseas to fight and was kept back to train others. After the war ended he was sent to Japan. I believe he was spared twice.


Date: Thu, 29 Sep 2005 23:20:01 -0700 (PDT) 
From: "David Hudson" <g2ordo4n@yahoo.com> 
Subject: Troop Train Wreck Info 

Hello Sir,
My name is David Hudson. The reason I am e-mailing you is about your website on the troop train wreck. My
grandfather is Arlston Roach, when he was a young boy he was at the site of the wreck. There is a picture
that was printed in a newspaper from that time with him sitting on a rock at the scene. He always told me
this story. But years ago we were in Lafollette visiting family and he took me into a Barber Shop were
this newspaper was hanging on the wall and sure enough he was the little boy sitting on the rock he has told
me about for years. The barber refused to sell him the paper. Is there anyway you can get that newspaper or
picture. It means a lot to him and myself. We live in Calumet City, IL my phone number is (708) 862-0992 my
cell phone is (708) 257-1183. Thank you so much


From: Rockiedog60@wmconnect.com 
Date: Wed, 28 Sep 2005 10:18:02 EDT 
Subject: Re: picture of my father 

Phil 

My sister requested that I send you a picture of my father who was in the troop train wreck of July 6,1944 at Clear Fork Canyon. My father Houston B. Kelley was inducted 6/28/1944 at Ft. Benjamin Harrison Ind. where he boarded a troop train going to Camp Croft S.C. for training. While in route along with two of his friends Hargis Salyer, and Raymond Combs. Hargis stated to my father that the train was going to derail if it didn't slow down. Dad said that Hargis had no more than made the statement when it derailed. My father was in the car behind the tender laying on its side, he managed to climb out window with help from others. A piece of metal had punctured his liver and he was taken to Oak Ridge Hospital then from there to Moore Gen. Hospital Swannanoa, North Carolina. My father was discharged Sept. 1, 1944 with nervous condition and drew a small pension for about three year, when the Veterans Administration reviewed his case and determined that his disability was not incurred while in the Military and discontinued his pension Nov 30,1947. My father was never in good health after that tragic day of the train wreck, and was constantly in and out of the veterans hospital. If I can be of any other help please Write or e-mail 
Kenneth H. Kelley 
2327 Calico Rd. 
Berea, Ky 40403 
khkpk60@wmconnect.com 


Houston Butler Kelley


To: suemike_anderson@hotmail.com
Subject: Arthur Leroy Wilson
Date: Mon, 26 Sep 2005 08:04:21 -0700 (PDT)

re: http://www.drwebman.com/trooptrainwreck/ 
Hi Sue,
If I've not yet asked, do you have a pic of your father in his Army uniform (or from that era) you an send me to put on my website?
Thank you,
Phil
-------------------------------------------------
Sue Anderson <suemike_anderson@hotmail.com> wrote:

Let me know if this is what you are looking for and that you received it.
Thanks
Sue
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
To: Sue Anderson <suemike_anderson@hotmail.com>
Subject: www.TroopTrain.com RE: Arthur Leroy Wilson 1944
Date: Mon, 26 Sep 2005 18:31:47 -0700 (PDT)

Hi Sue,
Those are great!
(Do you know if any of his pictured buddies were on the train with him???)
Thank you,
Phil
ps: I now have a new domain and he'll be on it: www.TroopTrain.com 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
From: "Sue Anderson" <suemike_anderson@hotmail.com> 
Subject: RE: www.TroopTrain.com RE: Arthur Leroy Wilson 1944 
Date: Wed, 28 Sep 2005 08:31:38 -0700 

Yes that was Ray W. Parker. All of those in the picture lived in the Waynesburg area with Dad. They all knew each other and were friends. Played Baseball together. Bumgard was one of them but mom can not remember much about him except that dad knew him well.

Sue

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
To: Sue Anderson <suemike_anderson@hotmail.com>
Subject: RE: www.TroopTrain.com RE: Arthur Leroy Wilson 1944
Date: Tue, 27 Sep 2005 14:32:51 -0700 (PDT)

Hi Sue,
It is so cool you have those pics.
Is "Billy" the "Ray W. Parker" of Trenton, Ohio listed as dying in the accident???
Any idea who "Bumgard" was? (1st or last name???)
Thanks so much,
Phil
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
To: Sue Anderson <suemike_anderson@hotmail.com>
Subject: RE: www.TroopTrain.com RE: Arthur Leroy Wilson 1944
Date: Tue, 27 Sep 2005 14:32:51 -0700 (PDT)

Hi Sue,
It is so cool you have those pics.
Is "Billy" the "Ray W. Parker" of Trenton, Ohio listed as dying in the accident???
Any idea who "Bumgard" was? (1st or last name???)
Thanks so much,
Phil
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Sue Anderson <suemike_anderson@hotmail.com> wrote:

As we understand it all were on the train but in different cars. Jimmy held his brother-in-law Virgil Marshall by the hair of his head up out of the water to keep him from drowning. Pulled all the muscles in his shoulder & arm.

Billy died later in the hospital. What happened to the rest my mom can not remember. We do know Billy's parents had been to see him and my Dads parents were driving them home since they flew in. But on the way home they were stopped and brought back to the hospital because Billy had died. My grandparents then went on home. 

Dad & Billy were at the Jelico hospital because they were so badly hurt. The others went to other hospitals. Dad was considered the worst one hurt that lived. At least that is what he was told. 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
From: "Sue Anderson" <suemike_anderson@hotmail.com> 
Subject: Another victim of the train wreck 
Date: Sun, 24 Oct 2004 08:50:48 -0700 

My father, Arthur Leroy Wilson, was in that train wreck. According to the information we received, My father was the worst one hurt that lived. He was placed with the dead ones until they discovered he was still alive. He had broken back, legs and the list goes on. They told him he would never walk. He told them he would and could not accept not walking. He did not say this as nicely as I stated but he did eventually walk. He limped from that time on. He had lots of problems with circulation and other circulatory problems the rest of his life. 

He died Feb 18, 1996 in a car accident. He received partial benefits and received 100 percent disability prior to his death. He was a very proud man and would not try to get benefits until he really needed them. Because of 
this pride, my mother could not get her benefits at his death. His records were burned that could have proved the extent of his injuries. Those lives that were destroyed, the destruction still continues today to the families of these men because of "lost" records.

The AMVETS rep Richard Miller seemed bored & disinterested when we went to him for help. When heard back from the Department of Veterans affairs, they declined her benefits. Then a letter came from Richard Miller and he stated he agreed with this decision. It also stated that we had tried once before to get these benefits but we had not. We responded that fraud might be involved if someone tried to get benefits. My mom decided just to let it go.

Thanks for listening 

This next article was sent to me by Douglas Eckstein and I believe transcribed from the 
Christian Journal-Leader
, Vol 3, Issue 9, Friday August 26, 2005, Jellico, TN

Survivor returns to Jellico 61 years later
 by Jake Bennett, Jellico Tourism Director 


Survivor: 
Clarence L. Eckstein
(circa 1944)

Survivor: 
Clarence L. Eckstein
(circa 2005)

After a 61 year absence, Clarence L. Eckstein of Celina, Ohio returned to Jellico. July 6, 1944 just after 9 p.m. Eckstein was one of many soldiers on his way to South Carolina before being shipped to Germany. Just after Eckstein had just bedded down in the Pullman car directly behind the dining car, tragedy struck as the troop train left the tracks and plummeted into the black depth of the Clearfork River Gorge known as the “Narrows.” The sound must have been deafening as the Pullmans and other cars began piling into the river on top of each other. The rear of the sleeping car came to rest at the same level as the rail tracks, but was being held upright over the river gorge by a car that was standing on its end in the river bed. Eckstein’s head nearly broke through the wall in front of his bed. He was so dazed that he hardly remembers being escorted out the rear of the car by other survivors of the tragedy. The twisted and burning cars, nearly 100 feet below in the river bed, claimed 44 lives and injured hundreds more. This is the United States single most deadly non-combat military tragedy. Eckstein returned to the scene recently and from about 100 feet away at a memorial plaque across from the site on Highway 25W, he again thanked God for stopping the car he was riding from the disasters of the other cars below him. Eckstein was sent on to South Carolina and was shipped to Germany and was involved in a number of major battles in that country.

Eckstein is a true hero and is carrying on the tradition of an annual reunion with his old comrades. This year the reunion is in Louisville, KY. Eckstein now 81 years old, came to Jellico with his wife, daughter and son in law and visited the site of the tragedy. He also visited the memorial in Jellico’s Veterans Park. As he stood there looking at the names of his departed comrades that are engraved in the marble, one could see the loss that he feels in his heart. Eckstein says he would like to return to Jellico again someday to reminisce the tragedy and again thank God for looking down on him that fateful night 61 years ago. 

If you would like to contact Clarence, here is his  email: clbex@adelphia.net 


I found this posting online:

I was a soldier in the troop train that derailed in the vicinity of Jellico in June, 1944. Did your newspaper cover that wreck and would you have an old copy I could buy? 
Robert Baynes <111725@msn.com>
Citrus Heights, California USA - Fri Aug 2 14:20:06 2002


From : "Robert Baynes" 111725@msn.com
Subject : train wreck 1944 
Date : Wed, 12 Nov 2003 14:55:50 -0800 

Phil Lea

I was a draftee on the train that derailed and wrecked at Jellico, Tennessee--in one of the cars that went into the gorge. I have received, via the internet, an indication that you may have access to information concerning that accident. Specifically, I would be interested in obtaining a copy of the book "She Jumped The Tracks" which I understand is in the possession of your father. I will gladly pay any costs involved in the duplication and mailing of the document. Secondly, I might be interested in buying a copy of the video related to the wreck if I had a little more information---What is included in the video? There were no video cameras at that time. How much of the video is about the wreck (time wise) and how much concerns other historical data about Tennessee? 

Bob Baynes
E-mail 111725@msn.com 


From: "Robert/Carol Baynes" 111725@msn.com 
To: drwebman@yahoo.com 
Subject: 1944 Troop Train Wreck 
Date: Tue, 13 Sep 2005 16:04:35 -0700 

Phil Lea:

Was surprised to get your e-mail! I started my search for the 1944 wreck information about three years ago. I received many responses from a variety of people but not one from anyone who had been in the wreck. One person did send me an e-mail of your article which I read with great interest. Ultimately I was connected with John P. Ascher who had written a book on the disaster, but when I spoke with him he said that the book was out of print. Believe it or not another of my correspondents said that he thought he saw it on E-bay and lo and behold I bid on it and was able to buy it. I suppose most of the people involved in the accidents have forgotten about it or are dead. Anyway, the book is quite detailed and includes quite a few pictures.

Recently my wife and I visited the site at Jellico and I was surprised that the gorge was as deep as it was--I don't remember because it happened about 9:30 at night.
My story is as follows: I was inducted into the army immediately upon graduation from high school in Mantua, Ohio and went to Fort Ben Harrison in Indiana. Ultimately we were put on a train for transportation to basic training but we didn't know where. The date was July 6,1944 and the trip was uneventful up until about 9:30 that evening. I was in an upper bunk and thought to myself that the train seemed to be going very fast. All of a sudden the car I was in started to tip sideways, so I grabbed a bar overhead and hung on. When the car stopped, it was lying on its side and we started climbing out the windows. I climbed up the side of the gorge to the tracks and helped others trying to do the same. Ultimately I was ordered to deliver records to a hospital in Jellico which I did -- I don't remember how I got back down the hill and across the gorge and back up the other side to the closest road but I did. The next day those of us that were not injured were put another train and we continued on our journey. I ended up at Camp Croft, South Carolina and after completing basic training went on to officer candidate school at Fort Benning, Georgia. The picture I'm sending obviously was taken after I was commissioned. John Ascher has printed additional copies of his book and I'm sure you would enjoy reading it if you haven't already done so. If the picture doesn't go thru, let me know and I'll send one by mail.



Bob Baynes
7517 Quail Vista Lane
Citrus Heights, CA 95610
916 723 8001 


From: "Charlie Sheets" <cesheets@charter.net> 
Subject: drwebman.com/trooptrainwreck 
Date: Tue, 5 Apr 2005 08:57:42 -0500 

Phil:

I just happened to stumble upon your tribute page regard the troop train accident and found it an interesting read. However, being interested in seeing what the Commissioner of the former Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) had to report on it, I done the research and found the official ICC report. Not knowing if you are aware of this accident report, please navigate to the following link, where, if you click on the year 1944, you will find said report...

http://dotlibrary2.specialcollection.net/scripts/ws.dll?websearch&site=dot_railroads

Charlie Sheets


From: ship@eohio.net 
Subject: Jellico Train Wreck
Date: Wed, 30 Mar 2005 19:43:07 GMT

Phil,
I just found your website regarding the Jellico troop train wreck. My 
grandfather perished in that accident (if it can be termed an accident) 
and I believe he was in the first or second coach back from the tender. 
His name was Joseph G. Shipbaugh, from Canton, Ohio. The monument and 
the book both list his middle initial as E., but this is incorrect (his 
middle name was Grant).

Thank you so much for your tribute to these men, both those lost and 
those who survived.

Joseph G. Shipbaugh IV
East Rochester,
Ohio



From: DMurtz@aol.com  
Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 21:18:19 EST 
Subject: (Troop Train wreck)
To: phil@drtrain.com 


THE STORY ON THE TRAIN WRECK SURE BROUGHT BACK SOME HORRID MEMORIES.
I WAS IN THAT MESS. 

BEFORE I WAS DRAFTED, I WORKED AS A FIREMAN ON THE PENN. R.R... 
I WAS THE GUY THAT TOLD MY BUNK MATE (HE WAS IN THE UPPER) THAT THE ENGINEER MISSED A DYNAMITE CAP. HE HIT TWO AND NEVER SIGNALED. THEN I TOLD HIM THAT IF WE DID NOT SLOW DOWN WE WERE GOING TO LEAVE THE TRACKS. YOU COULD FEEL THE WHEELS LIFT OFF THE TRACKS AND THEN SET BACK DOWN. ABOUT 3 OR 4 MIN. LATER WE WERE IN THE BOTTOM OF THE GORGE. THERE WERE THREE PASSENGER CARS AT THE BOTTOM TWO ON THERE SIDE AND OURS ACROSS THE TOP OF THEM. ONE GI STOOD IN THE CREEK (IN THE HOT WATER AND LET US CLIMB DOWN HIS BACK. WE FOUND OUT LATER HE HAD A CRUSHED VERTEBRAE. HE WAS FROM ALLIANCE OHIO MY HOME TOWN.

THE TRAIN WAS GOING FROM CORBIN KY. TO CAMP CROFT S.C. FOR BASIC TRAINING.
THE INJURED WITH ME WERE TAKEN TO OAK RIDGE TENN. AT THAT TIME NO ONE HAD ANY IDEA WHAT WAS THERE NOT EVEN THE PEOPLE THAT WORKED THERE, BUT THAT IS ANOTHER STORY.

I THOUGHT YOU WOULD LIKE TO KNOW.

DMURTZ@AOL.COM

murtz_dick

Richard J. (Dick) Murtz
BRANCH OF SERVICE: U.S. Army

HOMETOWN: Alliance, OH 

ACTIVITY DURING WWII: 
MEMBER OF THE 10TH MOUNTAIN DIVISION. WOUNDED APRIL 18, 1945. RECEIVED PURPLE HEART. 

---------------------------------

From: DMurtz@aol.com   Date:
Tue, 1 Mar 2005 20:49:08 EST
Subject: Re: Troop Train Wreck http://www.drwebman.com/trooptrainwreck/
To: drwebman@yahoo.com


I HAVE NO PICTURES. THE ONLY THING I CAME OUT OF THE WRECK WITH WAS MY G.I. SHORTS. AND A LOT OF MEMORIES. YOU CAN USE ANY OF THIS AS YOU SEE FIT. 

THE PART OF THE STORY TO WIND THIS UP WAS OUR TRIP TO OAK RIDGE TN.
THEY LOADED US IN GI AMBULANCES AND WE WENT SAILING TO OAK RIDGE HOSPITAL TO RECUPERATE.
THIS WAS A TIME WHEN NO ONE HAD ANY IDEA WHAT WAS THERE. NOT EVEN PEOPLE WORKING THERE .
EVERYTHING IN THIS CAMP WAS FREE TO ALL. THE CAFETERIA HAD A SPREAD YOU WOULD NOT BELIEVE
THREE CHOICES OF MEAT FOR BREAKFAST AND THE OTHER MEALS WERE ALSO UNREAL.
I TOLD ONE OF THE GUYS I DONT KNOW WHY I HEARD G.I.'s COMPLAINING ABOUT THE ARMY FOOD. I FOUND OUT LATER WHEN WE GOT TO CAMP CROFT S.C.

WHILE I WAS AT OAK RIDGE THEY ASKED ME IF I HAD MET A GUY BY THE NAME OF RED MADDOX /MATTOX (SP?) I SAID YES WE TALKED AT THE CAMP IN INDIANA BEFORE WE GOT ON THE TRAIN. THEY TOLD ME THEY HAD TWO BODIES IN THE MORGUE THAT THE NEEDED TO I.D. WE GOT IN A STAFF CAR AND STARTED INTO TOWN.
WE STOPED AT THREE GATES ON THE WAY OUT AND GOT PAPERS AT EACH GATE IN TRIPLICATE. WE WERE TOLD TO BE BACK BEFORE DARK OR NOT TO EVEN TRY TO GET BACK IN.

ALL THE BODIES WERE LAID OUT ON THE FLOOR AND SO BLOATED YOU HAD A HARD TIME MAKING OUT FACIAL FEATURES. I HAD TO GET DOWN AN LOOK UP THE SIDE OF THE FACE AND I COULD SEE THE RED HAIR ROOTS AND HE HAD A FRESH HAIR CUT I GAVE THIS TO THE LT. AND HE SAID THAT WAS FINE NOW THEY KNEW WHO THE OTHER GI WAS. I SAW RED IN THE BARBER SHOP IN IND.

THIS WILL STICK WITH ME THE REST OF MY LIFE.
I STILL THINK THE TRAIN CREW WAS UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF SOMETHING OR THEY WOULD HAVE SOUNDED THE HORN WHEN THE HIT THE CAPS ON THE TRACK. THEY MAY HAVE FALEN ASLEEP IF WE WERE SUPOSED TO CHANGE CREWS IN CORBIN KY.

 BEST TO YOU AND THE FINE PEOPLE THAT HELPED US. 
IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS THAT I HAVE NOT COVERED LET ME KNOW.

DICK MURTZ   


Jim Hatcher
PO Box 241
La Follette, TN 37766

Jan. 15, 2005

Hi Phil:

I figure I can get this in the mail to you easier than I can set on line and type it, so here goes. 

First let me tell you a little about myself, keeping this in mind, will make my account of the troop train wreck more understandable.
I was born in Williamsburg, Kentucky, and at the time of this wreck, I was 5 years old, and living just south of Williamsburg in a little community called, Savoy, Ky. This train wreck made quite an impression on me as a child, because I can still remember it today.

My father and my grandfather both worked for the L&N Railroad, so like yourself, I grew up around railroads and trains most of my life. My dad, H.E. "Gene" Hatcher, was a clerk and later on changed over to a cook for the rail gang that was laying what they called the ribbon rail in the late 60's and early 70's. Those were the days of the camp cars, when the men would live all week in the coaches at the job site. Dad and his gang spent a lot of time in and around Ocoee and your area. Your dad may have known my dad. My Grandfather, on my mother's side was George Henry "Dutch" Klein. He was section gang foreman, and his territory was from Jellico, Ky to Emlyn, Ky, south of Williamsburg. He lived in one of the section houses that the railroad then provided,
in Saxton, Ky.

I remember one of our neighbors drove my parents and me over to the site of the wreck. We were not allowed to stop, and were told to keep moving. It was a sad and tragic thing to see even from the highway. My grandfather and his men were down in the river with others, helping to get the dead and injured out. They worked day and night.

We lived near the tracks at Savoy, the main line was directly in back of our house, also two storage tracks. When they got all of the coaches and engine out of the river, they pulled them into the storage yard there at Savoy. My dad took me down to the tracks and we walked through the different coaches. I still remember how twisted and mangled the interiors were.

After my grandfather retired, and I was older, I asked him what he thought might have caused that train to wreck. He stated that speed was probably the major factor, and this put so much pressure on the pilot wheels of the engine that the flange or flanges on the wheels broke off causing it to jump the tracks.

I now live in La Follette, TN. about 10 or 12 miles south of the wreck site. Have lived here since 1953. My dad retired from the L & N in 1973 and passed away in 1976. 

I don't know if I have given you any info that you didn't already know, but I have enjoyed sharing it with you, and if there is any part of this letter you may want to add to your website, feel free to do so, you have my permission! Also, let me say that I enjoy visiting your other web sites, and I love the Harley!!! 

Stay in touch, and best of luck to you and your family. 
Jim Hatcher


From: "NORMA COLE" <necole4@msn.com> 
To: phil@drtrain.com 
Subject: trooptrain wreck of 44 
Date: Tue, 28 Dec 2004 13:40:54 -0600 

Hello Phil,
My name is Norma Cole, my husbands' father Raymond Cole was on that train and died there in Jellico 2 days after the wreck. I am writing to see if it is possible for me to obtain a copy of she jumped the track if at all possible if so please let me know what the cost would be.
Thank you very much

Mrs. Larry Ray Cole 
Brazil, In 


From: "NORMA COLE" <necole4@verizon.net>
To: phil@drtrain.com 
Date: Tue, 28 Dec 2004 10:02:58 -0600 

Hello Phil,
My name is Norma Cole, my husbands' father died 2 days after that crash there in Jellico, he was in that train crash. I was wondering if you had any copies of "she jumped the tracks" left. My husbands' fathers name was Raymond (Ray) Cole.
Could you please let me know if you do and if you don't have any copies left how we can acquire one, would love to be able to give this bit of heritage to my husband and his siblings.
Thank You Very Much
Norma Cole
Brazil, In


From: "Sue Anderson" suemike_anderson@hotmail.com 
To: phil@drtrain.com 
Subject: Another victim of the train wreck 
Date: Sun, 24 Oct 2004 08:50:48 -0700 

My father, Arthur Leroy Wilson, was in that train wreck. According to the information we received, My father was the worst one hurt that lived. He was placed with the dead ones until they discovered he was still alive. He had broken back, legs and the list goes on. They told him he would never walk. He told them he would and could not accept not walking. He did not say this as nicely as I stated but he did eventually walk. He limped from that time on. He had lots of problems with circulation and other circulatory problems the rest of his life. 

He died Feb 18, 1996 in a car accident. He received partial benefits and received 100 percent disability prior to his death. He was a very proud man and would not try to get benefits until he really needed them. Because of this pride, my mother could not get her benefits at his death. His records were burned that could have proved the extent of his injuries. Those lives that were destroyed, the destruction still continues today to the families of these men because of "lost" records.


The AMVETS rep Richard Miller seemed bored & disinterested when we went to him for help. When heard back from the Department of Veterans affairs, they declined her benefits. Then a letter came from Richard Miller and he stated he agreed with this decision. It also stated that we had tried once before to get these benefits but we had not. We responded that fraud might be involved if someone tried to get benefits. My mom decided just to let it go. 


Thanks for listening


Arthur Leroy Wilson
(circa 1944)


Subject: drwebman.com/trooptrainwreck 
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2004 09:38:58 -0500 
From: "Kathy Howard" Kathy_Howard@berea.edu 
To: phil@drtrain.com 

My father was on the Troop Train Wreck July 6, 1944.  He survived the 
wreck but passed away in 1976 at the young age of 54.  I am very much 
interested in the video you have for sale.  Can you give me specific 
information as to what is in the video?

Kathy Howard
Berea Kentucky



CLICK HERE to return to..........
my www.TroopTrain.com website tribute for 
the troop train wreck of July 6, 1944 near Jellico TN






 

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Want your own www.YOURNAME.com Domain name?
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1995 Harley Davidson Heritage Softail Classic
Only 8,000 miles, Rare original yellow & white paint, wide white-walls


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Phil's LINKS below!


 



My Nice 1967 Chevelle Malibu For Sale $29k or Trade
327 engine, Factory Air, Automatic, PS, PB, PDL, Flowmasters, Buckets, 8-Track Player

www.1967Malibu.com



Super Nice 1984 Monte Carlo For Sale $19k or Trade
350 Crate Motor, Factory Air, Automatic, PS, PDB, PDL, Holley, Headers, Flowmasters, Bench Seat, Column Shift

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Ocoee Power

offers Sales & Installation of Standby Power Generators for your home & business

www.OcoeePower.com


 

My www.DRWEBMAN.com FREE WEBSITES Webmaster site
My www.OcoeeRealty.com, site to BUY, SELL or TRADE Homes, Land, Properties, etc...
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My www.drwebman.com/harley 1995 Harley Heritage Softail Classic w/9,000 miles
My www.LeroyMercerCD.com Website The real story of the "Real Leroy Mercer" (aka: John Bean) tribute
My www.euchee.com/yuchi tribute to Euchee / Yuchi Indians
My www.drwebman.com/signs Funny / off-color HERE'S YOUR SIGN pics found across the world
My www.PhotosOfCleveland.com old photos of Cleveland TN website
My www.drwebman.com/sweatbee website the tells how I keep sweat bees from sting me
My www.MyLostToys.com website that's a search for MY LOST TOYS
My www.TroopTrain.com website
that pays tribute to the L&N WW-II train wreck near Jellico TN
My www.drwebman.com/sellit/#j45 for more information on my 1964 Gibson J-45 Guitar
My www.drwebman.com/sellit/#strad for more information on my FOR SALE Upright Stradivarius Bass "Fiddle" with Carved top
My www.OcoeeTN.com website
My www.1967Malibu.com website that features my 1967 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu with Factory Air for Sale or Trade
My www.drwebman.com/classof70 website for our Polk County High School graduating class of 1970
My www.drwebman.com/8-tracks website about 8-track tapes, 8-tracks, 8-track tape players
My www.OcoeePower.com website where we at Ocoee Power sell and install standby Power Generators
My www.1984MonteCarlo.com My 1984 Monte Carlo w/350 crate motor, automatic, A/C, Flowmasters, Holley & Headers. Sale or Trade.




 



My Dad's 1950 Chevrolet 2-door Deluxe

www.1950Chevrolet.com

 




 


      
 

 

 

 

OcoeeRealty.com is a great website where you can buy, sell or trade properties.

Advertise your property on Ocoee Realty .com or browse the ads.

(Click on the images below for more information on the properties for sale.)



For you next Karaoke Party, contact:

www.DRKARAOKE.com

 

Check out my MyLostToys.com website

Mr. MacPooch American Plastic Bricks

 

that features toys from my childhood 

www.MyLostToys.com

 

 


Check out my Dr. Shock website:
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Check out my tribute to Cleveland TN 
www.PhotosOfCleveland.com



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      Ingrid                 Rebel and
Bob Brandy

Click HERE to see my Tribute To Bob Brandy


John Bean 
1951-1984
(the REAL, the one, the only true Leroy Mercer)

www.LeroyMercerCD.com

Click HERE to see my Tribute To the REAL Leroy Mercer


www.TroopTrain.com

My website that chronicles the WW-II Troop Train wreck near Jellico TN on July 6, 1944



The BAT CREEK STONE

www.euchee.com/yuchi

My tribute to the Yuchi Indians

(Could the Yuchi be one of the lost tribes of Israel???)